Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea and Swine Enteric Coronavirus Disease

Swine enteric coronavirus disease (SECD) is a disease in swine caused by emerging porcine coronaviruses, including porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and porcine delta coronavirus (PDCoV). SECD is characterized by an acute, rapidly spreading viral diarrhea of pigs; no other species are known to be affected and it is not a public health threat. Pigs develop varying degrees of diarrhea and lack of appetite depending upon age of the pig infected.

Indiana SECD Situation Report  1 October 2015

Archive of past SECD Situation Reports

PEDv Resource Book by pork.org

Definitions

Suspect herd: A swine herd in which one or more age groups are affected with acute, contagious, watery diarrhea.

Presumptive positive case: A pig that has tested positive for PEDV, PDCoV, or other emerging swine enteric coronavirus by PCR, virus isolation, and/or viral genetic sequencing, with either non-specific, unknown, or no clinical signs/history consistent with SECD.

Presumptive positive herd: A swine herd with one or more presumptive positive cases. Presumptive positive herds will be subject to further inquiry for confirmation.

Confirmed positive case: A pig that has:

  • Tested positive for PEDV, PDCoV, or other emerging swine enteric coronavirus by PCR, virus isolation, and/or viral genetic sequencing;
    AND

  • Has a history of clinical signs consistent with SECD, or is from a swine herd with a history of clinical signs consistent with SECD.

Confirmed positive herd: A swine herd with one or more confirmed positive cases.

  

NOTE: PDCoV and PEDv are not required to be reported to BOAH as of April 17, 2018. USDA repealed this reporting requirement on March 6, 2018.  

 

Sample Herd plan  (Voluntary)

Herd plan instructions

Click here for USDA webpage with more information