Outdoor Indiana - January/February 2017 - Featured Stories

From the Governor
A Fun Resolution
THIS OLD HOUSE
Meet the new TRUST

From the Director

From the Governor
GOVERNOR BIDS FOND FAREWELL

Governor PenceAs I leave the Office of the Governor to become Vice President of the United States, I take with me fond memories of the many hours spent enjoying Indiana's natural beauty.

Like so many Hoosiers, I find that outdoor recreation throughout our magnificent state helps focus the mind and renew the spirit.

Our forests, prairies, lakes, rivers and wildlife contribute in real and meaningful ways to our quality of life and thriving economy. I’m proud our administration has taken strong steps to conserve our environment.

In an article I wrote for Outdoor Indiana in 2013, I specifically lauded two DNR land conservation programs—the Healthy Rivers INitiative (HRI) and the Bicentennial Nature Trust (BNT). I referred to these efforts as "big, bold ideas with clear goals aimed at improving our environment and benefitting Hoosiers."

Since then, HRI has passed the midpoint of its goal to protect 70,000 acres along the Wabash River, Muscatatuck River and Sugar Creek.

Meanwhile, BNT has jumped from 30 projects to more than 180, protecting more than 10,000 acres.

Karen and I will always remember our many hikes and horseback rides at Indiana's state parks. I’ve often said Indiana has the best state parks system in the country, and it's true. It is no wonder more than 16 million people annually visit our 32 state park properties.

Serving as your governor has been the honor of a lifetime. I'm grateful for the privilege to have worked with you to preserve Indiana's extraordinary natural resources.

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A Fun Resolution

First Day Hikes make for a healthy New Year’s party
By Nick Werner, OI staff

One of the most popular of Indiana State Parks’ First Day Hikes is at Indiana Dunes State Park, where selfie-takers faced the 3 Dune Challenge.If you love sports and the outdoors, here’s good news.

Jan. 1, 2017, falls on a Sunday. When New Year’s Day is a Sunday, organizers of the Rose Bowl and Cotton Bowl move their games to Monday. Not a single college football bowl game will be played on Jan. 1 this year.

That’s just one more reason to attend a First Day Hike at an Indiana State Parks property.

First Day Hikes are a healthy way to start the year and a chance to get outside, exercise, enjoy nature and connect with friends. The hikes are hosted each Jan. 1 by staff and volunteers at Indiana’s 32 state park properties and are part of a nationwide program promoted by the non-profit organization America’s State Parks.

Cutline: One of the most popular of Indiana State Parks’ First Day Hikes is at Indiana Dunes State Park, where selfie-takers faced the 3 Dune Challenge.

To read the rest of this article subscribe to Outdoor Indiana or pick up a copy at most Barnes and Noble bookstores, and state park inns. To subscribe, click here or call (317) 233-3046.

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THIS OLD HOUSE

Historic mansions teach more than architecture
By Nick Werner, OI staff

The Lanier Mansion was the 1844 Greek revival home of James F. D. Lanier in Madison.Celery has lost its grandeur.

In the 1800s, the vegetable conveyed status because farming celery is complicated. To prevent bitterness, farmers must shade plants from sunlight in the weeks before harvest—a process called blanching. Before modern machinery, blanching was expensive.

Families like the Laniers of Madison served celery to dinner guests in crystal vases that doubled as centerpieces.

“If you could afford to have celery, you wanted to show it off,” said Gerry Reilly.

Reilly manages the Lanier Mansion State Historic Site. A celery vase sits on the dining table, surrounded by fine China, gilded molding and French wallpaper depicting an imaginary “Oriental” landscape.

Madison is famous for historic riverfront homes, and Lanier Mansion is the crown jewel. But in nearly every sizable city in Indiana, one or more entrepreneurs built a home that stands as a legacy of early American fortunes.

Cutline: The Lanier Mansion was the 1844 Greek revival home of James F. D. Lanier in Madison.

To read the rest of this article subscribe to Outdoor Indiana or pick up a copy at most Barnes and Noble bookstores, and state park inns. To subscribe, click here or call (317) 233-3046.

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Meet the new TRUST

Renamed funding source replaces IHT
By Marty Benson, OI staff

The Sam Shine Foundation Preserve’s bottomlands and hillside woods stretch along more than a mile of Beanblossom Creek frontage and will be prime habitat for wildlife. After more than 70,000 acres and 24 years, renaming Indiana’s main money mechanism for preserving land after a former president from Indiana made sense.

Now it’s called the President Benjamin Harrison Conservation Trust.

Harrison Trust, or HCT for short, replaces Indiana Heritage Trust (IHT) and includes a few fine-print changes. But the Environmental License Plate stays the same, and its sales will continue to fund the program, bolstered by allocations from the General Assembly and private donations. The plate still costs $40, of which HCT gets $25. …

If either or both of the names Michel Brouillet and Sam Shine sound familiar, it’s probably for vastly different reasons. They belong to men with disparate backgrounds, from different eras, but they share at least one common bond.

Their namesakes were the most notable acquisitions using IHT and BNT funds, respectively, since last October.

Cutline: The Sam Shine Foundation Preserve’s bottomlands and hillside woods stretch along more than a mile of Beanblossom Creek frontage and will be prime habitat for wildlife.

To read the rest of this article subscribe to Outdoor Indiana or pick up a copy at most Barnes and Noble bookstores, and state park inns. To subscribe, click here or call (317) 233-3046.

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