1.5 Years (Yearling)

Yearlings and older deer will have 6 cheek teeth. Yearlings can be identified by looking at the replacement of the temporary tricuspid third tooth with a permanent bicuspid tooth. A yearling can be identified by one of any three possibilities:

1) The third tooth is tricuspid (3 ridges on the side) and heavily worn. This is the milk premolar that has yet to be replaced by the permanent tooth that will be bicuspid (two ridges on the side);

Photo of deer jaw with six teeth and a tricuspid third tooth indicating a yearling.

Close-up photo of deer jaw with six teeth and a heavily worn tricuspid third tooth indicating a yearling.

2) The permanent third tooth is erupting from the gum line and is lower than the other cheek teeth;

Deer jaw photo showing third tooth erupting out of the gum line. It will look much whiter and be smaller than the other cheek teeth.

Close-up of deer jaw photo showing third tooth erupting out of the gum line. It will look much whiter and be smaller than the other cheek teeth.

3) Or, the permanent third tooth is bicuspid (two ridges on the side), but lacks tartar or staining and is whiter than the adjacent molar. All of the crests on the last three teeth (molars) will have very little wear.

Deer jaw photo showing bicuspid third tooth that is white and not covered in tartar - another sign of a yearling.

Close-up of deer jaw photo showing bicuspid third tooth that is white and not covered in tartar - another sign of a yearling.