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Indiana Department of Natural Resources

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Indiana Department of Natural Resources

State Parks > Parks & Lakes > O'Bannon Woods State Park O'Bannon Woods State Park

O'Bannon Woods State Park
7234 Old Forest Road SW
Corydon, IN 47112
(812) 738-8232
Click for Corydon, Indiana Forecast
  • Property Advisories

O'Bannon Woods Events

O'Bannon Woods State Park (formerly Wyandotte Woods State Recreation Area) lies in the central and extreme southern part of the state, bordering the Ohio River. It is nestled inside 26,000-acre Harrison Crawford State Forest, but is managed separately, along with Wyandotte Caves State Recreation Area. For more information about O'Bannon Woods or Wyandotte Caves, contact the park office at (812) 738-8232.

O’Bannon Woods was the location of one of the few African-American Civilian Conservation Corps units. The property also has a uniquely restored, working haypress barn, complete with oxen for power and a pioneer farmstead. Indiana’s first natural and scenic river, Blue River, flows through the state park and forest. 

Stagestop Campground, including the canoe access ramp located at Stagestop, is CLOSED until further notice. Please contact the property with any questions.

During the summer, pool hours may change because of weather and staffing. Please contact the property office for exact times before your visit.

The Corydon Capitol State Historic Site is located near the park. Visitors can learn about early Indiana history as they tour the beautiful first state capitol building, built entirely of limestone, and old town square.

WYANDOTTE CAVE TOURS
After a grand re-opening on July 9-10, 2016, when all tours will be free, Wyandotte Caves will reopen to the public for fee-based guided summer tours.

Tours are offered on Friday, Saturday, Sunday and holidays from July 15, 2016 through Labor Day Weekend (Sept. 5, 2016).

Jackets are recommended for all cave tours since cave temperature is always 52 degrees F. Comfortable and sturdy shoes are a must. Pets, alcohol, and tobacco use are strictly prohibited.

Little Wyandotte Tour - EASY
The Little Wyandotte Cave tour is the shortest and easiest trip available. This smaller cave, totally separated from Big Wyandotte Cave, offers a comprehensive view of many flowstone and dripstone formations. Sometimes cave dwelling species can be seen as well. The lack of any long stairways inside the cave makes this 30 – 45 minute trip ideal for visitors of all ages.

2016 tours of Little Wyandotte are open to all ages, and are offered at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays only. Cost is $8 for ages 12 and older; $4 for ages 6-11; and free for ages 5 and younger. Maximum group size is 15.

Big Wyandotte Tour (Monument Mountain Tour) - RUGGED
The huge underground “Monument Mountain” is a highlight of this two-hour, 1.5-mile headlamp/helmet trip through the deeper sections of Big Wyandotte Cave. Rare formations called helicities, plus gypsum, epsomite and prehistoric flint quarries add variety. People who sign up for this tour must be in good physical health and must be able to navigate steep terrain and many stairs. This trip is rewarding for visitors with the time and energy to see these unique cave features.

2016 Tours of Big Wyandotte Cave are for ages 6 and older only, and are offered at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays only. Cost is $18 for ages 12 and older; $9 for ages 6-11. Minimum group size is 15 and maximum is 25.

If you tour Big Wyandotte Cave, you will be required to walk across a rough decontamination surface near the cave entrance as you exit the cave to prevent the movement of the fungal spores that cause White-nose syndrome in bats. (WNS does not affect humans.) To learn more about WNS, visit dnr.IN.gov/batdisease.

ACTIVITIES

Camping - See campground maps under MAPS tab

  • Electric - 281 sites
  • Horseman Non-Electric - 47 sites
  • Primitive Non-Electric - 25 sites
  • Group Camp: 100-bed self-contained structures
  • Dumping Station

INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION OF HIKING TRAILS

Note: For trail locations, view the property map under the MAPS tab.

AA. FIRE TOWER TO ROCKY RIDGE BIKE AND HIKE TRAIL (2 miles) MODERATE TO RUGGED— Begins at the fire tower and travels west, intersecting with the Rocky Ridge Trail. Combined with the Rocky Ridge Trail and with a return to the fire tower this route provides 6 miles of mountain biking and hiking trail. Parking, comfort station and water are available at the fire tower.

A. ROCKY RIDGE BIKE AND HIKE TRAIL (2 miles), MODERATE—Begins and ends near campsite 35. This loop trail passes through deep ravines and up scenic, rocky slopes. Parking and water are available at the campground.

B. TULIP VALLEY TRAIL (2 miles), MODERATE— Begins across from the Group Camp, passes through the woods in front of Hickory Hollow Nature Center, and continues up the ridge to the campground. One mile of this trail is universally accessible from the Nature Center.

C. CCC GHOST TRAIL (1.25 miles), RUGGED—This trail begins and ends at the Group Camp and follows both sides of a dry creekbed. Be prepared for long, steep climbs and rocky descents. Parking is available at the Group Camp.

D. CLIFF DWELLER TRAIL (1.75 miles), MODERATE—This loop trail crosses a dry creekbed, follows a beautiful, spring-fed creek and has some long stretches of climbing. Parking is available at the Pioneer Shelter House.

E. WHITE-TAILED DEER TRAIL (1 mile), EASY—This trail begins at the entrance to Shelter House 2 picnic area and ends at the bottom of Shelter House 2 parking lot.

F. OHIO RIVER BLUFF TRAIL (1.5 miles), Rugged—This loop trail captures vistas of what the early settlers saw while traveling down the Ohio River. Follow the rocky escarpment bluff, as it meanders down to the horse trail from Shelter House 2 and back to the lower parking lot. It then skirts under the edge of the bluff and up the rock staircase, built by the CCC, back to the shelter.

G. POST-OAK CEDAR NATURE PRESERVE TRAIL (.8 miles), RUGGED—This trail is on Cold Friday Road, 1.5 miles south of the main property office. The Division of Nature Preserves requests that you register at the trailhead before entering the nature preserve.

H. SHARP SPRING TRAIL (1 mile), EASY to MODERATE— This trail loops around the perimeter of Wyandotte Wetlands and passes Sharp’s Spring on the lake’s backside. The parking lot shelter provides a beautiful spot for a picnic.

PLEASE STAY ON MARKED TRAILS.