IN.gov - Skip Navigation

Note: This message is displayed if (1) your browser is not standards-compliant or (2) you have you disabled CSS. Read our Policies for more information.

Amber Alert
Amber Alert - TEST

Indiana State Department of Health

ISDH Home > About the Agency > Health Information by Topic - A-Z >> > Arthritis > How Arthritis Affects Daily Life How Arthritis Affects Daily Life

Arthritis and Indiana:
Our State's Burden

Health status

Nearly 30 percent of respondents with arthritis either reported their health as poor (19.9 percent) or fair (9.8 percent).  This is more than four times higher than those reporting poor health with no arthritis and twice as high as those who reported fair health with no arthritis (see Figure 14).

Firgure 14
Fair and Poor General Health by Presence of Arthritis (Indiana 2005 BRFSS)

People with arthritis were more likely to have other chronic diseases, which may have contributed to their self-rated health status as fair or poor. Respondents with arthritis had a higher prevalence of diabetes, and asthma than those without arthritis (see Figure 15).

Figure 15
Diagnosed with Arthritis by Comorbidities (Indiana 2005 BRFSS)

People with arthritis were more likely to have days with poor physical health in the past month (7.1 days vs. 2.4 days for those without arthritis), poor mental health days (4.7 days vs. 3.4 days for those without arthritis), and days when their activities were limited (6.1 days vs. 2.7 days for those without arthritis) (See Figure 16).

 

Figure 16
Presence of Arthritis by Number of Days Health Not Good (Indiana 2005 BRFSS)

Among respondents with arthritis, women reported a higher mean number of poor physical health days than men (7.4 vs. 6.6) and a higher mean number of poor mental health days than men (5.2 vs. 4). However, both men and women reported the same number of days during the last month when their activities were limited (6.1) (see Figure 17).

Figure 17
Diagnosed with Arthritis by Number of Days Health Not Good by Gender
 (Indiana 2005 BRFSS)

 

Those identifying their race as “Other” had the highest rate of poor physical health days at 12.4 days per month, nearly doubling that of Whites (6.8), Blacks (6.4) and Hispanics (6.4) days. Those identifying their race as “Other” had the highest number of poor mental health days (6.2), and the most days with limited activities at 11.8, nearly double the number of those of Whites (5.8), Blacks (5.2), and Hispanics (5.7) (see Figure 18).

Figure 18
Days Health Not Good by Race/Ethnicity (Indiana 2005 BRFSS)

BRFSS data indicated that the presence of poor physical/mental health and limited activity days might have been dependent on household income rather than race. Respondents with annual incomes of less than $15,000 reported notably higher rates of poor physical health, mental health and number of limited activity days (See Figure 19).

Figure 19
Diagnosed with Arthritis by Number of Days Health Not Good by Income
(Indiana 2005 BRFSS)

Activity levels and limitations

Having arthritis/joint symptoms relates to lower activity levels in several ways. More than 35 percent of Hoosiers with arthritis answered “yes” to the question “Are you now limited in any way in any of your usual activities because of arthritis?” compared to 13 percent of those without arthritis (see Figure 20).

Figure 20
Presence of Arthritis by Activity Limitation Due to Joint Symptoms
(Indiana BRFSS 2005)

 

Obesity increased the likelihood that those with joint symptoms would suffer activity limitations. Individuals who were obese were more than 1.6 times more likely to report limitations from their arthritis than individuals who were not overweight, 35.8 percent and 21.8 percent, respectively (see Figure 21).



Figure 21
Presence of Activity Limitation Due to Joint Symptoms
by BMI (Indiana 2005 BRFSS)

Lower income also corresponded to limitations from arthritis. Nearly half (48.8 percent) of those with income lower than $15,000 reported limitations, compared to 20.8 percent of those with incomes $75,000 or more (see Figure 22).

Figure 22
Limited in Usual Activities Due to Joint Symptoms by Income Level
(Indiana 2005 BRFSS)

BRFSS data indicated that 38.4% of adults with arthritis met CDC’s recommendation for physical activity, compared to 47.1% of those without arthritis.14  Fifty-four percent of people with arthritis report insufficient or no physical activity (see Figure 23).

Figure 23
Comparison of Physical Activity between Arthritis and No Arthritis
(Indiana 2005 BRFSS)

 

 

 

 

_________________________________
14 “Vigorous” activity causes large increases in breathing and heart rate; examples are running, aerobics, or heavy yard work. “Moderate” activity causes small increases in breathing and heart rate; examples are brisk walking, bicycling, vacuuming and gardening. For BRFSS purposes, the activity must have been conducted for at least a 10-minute period.