Hepatitis A 2003

Table 1. Hepatitis A Cases by Race and Sex, Indiana, 2003

  2003 1999-2003
Cases Rate* Cases
Total 72 1.20 460
Race
   White 52 0.90 312
   Black 2 0.40 65
   Other 3 1.09 15
   Not Reported 15 - 68
Sex
   Male 32 1.10 278
   Female 40 1.30 181
   Not Reported 0 - 1

*Rate per 100,000 population based on the U.S. Census Bureau’s population data as of July 1, 2003

Hepatitis A is a viral infection of the liver transmitted most commonly by fecal-oral contact from contaminated food or water, or from person to person via contaminated hands or oral-anal contact. Hepatitis A virus infects primarily humans.

In 2003, 72 cases of hepatitis A were reported in Indiana for a rate of 1.20 cases per 100,000 population (Table 1). This represents a significant increase from 2002 (0.81). Figure 1 shows the number of reported cases per year for 1999-2003. The number of reported cases was highest during the spring and fall months (Figure 2). Figure 3 shows age-specific rates were greatest for adults aged 80 years and older (2.8), followed by adults aged 50-59 years (1.8), and preschoolers aged 1-4 years (1.4). Females (1.3) were more likely to be reported than males (1.1). The rate for other races (1.9) was higher than that for whites (0.9) and blacks (0.4); however, 15 cases (21%) did not report race data.

In 2003, 33 Indiana counties reported cases of hepatitis A. Three counties reported 5 or more cases (adjusted for population): Allen (3.0), Lake (1.4), and Marion (1.0) (Figure 4). There were no outbreaks of hepatitis A infection reported in Indiana in 2003. Two cases were related to outbreaks in other states. The most common risk factor reported for hepatitis A infection in 2003 was international travel (21%). Other common risk factors included contact with a confirmed case (15%), contact with a child in a child-care setting (11%), and raw shellfish consumption (7%).

You can learn more about hepatitis A by visiting the following Web site:
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/hepatitis/a/index.htm.