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Indiana State Department of Health

HIV/AIDS in Indiana > Advisory Groups > Community Planning Group (CPG) > CPG Meeting Minutes > CPG Meeting Minutes - January 20, 2009 CPG Meeting Minutes - January 20, 2009

 

IHIV PREVENTION COMMUNITY PLANNING GROUP ORIENTATION
January 20, 2009
10:00 to 4:00 p.m.
8-T1 and 8-T2

 

ATTENDANCE

Present CPG Members:

  • Brinegar, Emily
  • Grieb, Jody 
  • Morton, Ramon 
  • Rush, Nathan
  • Gillespie, Tony
  • Grudi, April
  • Nash, Rico
  • Stanley, Debra
  • Gilmore, Ramona
  • Hughes, Mark
  • Nix, Ryan
  • Urias Hail, Anna
  • Goode, Angela
  • Lausch, Judy
  • Pasco, Larry
  • Vesga, Jesus
  • Greene, Latorya
  • Lozano, Dolly
  • Prado-Reyna, Laura
  • Woods, Wendy

Absent CPG Members:

  • Harris, Larry (State Co-Chair)
  • Hillis, Jessica
  • Reynolds, Byron

Present ISDH Staff:

  • Arnold, Vivian
  • Bain, Cena
  • Johnson, Elloise
  • Renner, Sarah

Absent ISDH Staff:

  • Lloyd, Lisa

Present Technical Advisors:

  • Exom, Michael
  • Ohmit, Anita
  • Yoder, Beth
  • Feldheiser, Rochelle
  • Quintero, Liliana
  • Morgan, James
  • Wilder-Hamilton, Elonda

Absent Technical Advisors:

  • French, Paula

Guests:

  • Carr-Watkins, Michelle, NBAC
  • Wallace, Mike

GENERAL INFORMATION

  • Meeting was called to order at 10:15 by Ramon Morton, Community Co-Chair
  • Introductions made around the table/Ground Rules read by Ramon Morton/Mission read by Cena Bain
  • Mr. Mike Wallace begins Orientation with a Presentation explaining the History, the importance, and the relevance of Community Planning.  NOTE:  Mr. Wallace’s presentation will be posted on the website under January’s minutes.

Debra Stanley:  Gives the introduction to the Guidance.

The Guidance is located under TAB 4 in your Orientation Manual and is outlined as follows:

  1. Introduction
  2. The importance of HIV Prevention Community Plannin
    A.  CDC HIV Prevention Strategic Plan
    B.  Advancing HIV Prevention Initiative
    C.  Goals of HIV Prevention Community Planning
    D.  Guiding Principles for HIV Prevention Community Planning
  3. HIV Prevention Community Planning Process
     A.  The Comprehensive HIV Prevention Plan and Key Products
     B.  Planning Cycle
  4. Monitoring and Evaluation of HIV Prevention Community Planning
  5. Roles and Responsibilities
  6. Accountability
    A.  Program Performance Indicators
    B.  Concurrence, Concurrence with Reservations or Nonconcurrence
  7. Appendices

Highlights from Debra:

  • Commitment to the CPG requires work.
  • Any input shall be put in writing and dispersed to the rest of the committee.  If you want something included in the plan, submit it in writing.
  • Forward to Cena and she will disperse to the entire group.
  • Purpose of CPG is to collaborate with the State Department of Health in efforts to complete a Statewide Strategic Plan that helps reduce the transmission/acquisition of HIV.CPG works well with another and provide each other support when needed.

April Grudi: 

Can we get a copy of the Strategic Plan so we can look at what has been done in the past?

Cena Bain:   I will forward it this afternoon.  The plan is good through 2010.

Ramon Morton:   We are on a 3 year plan.

Ramon Morton: 

Determines that Quorum was met by having 15 of 18 members present with the two absent represented by Proxy’s.

Larry Pasco: 

Debra stated that we can not control the funding, but we can.  We can control that in our communities, we can demand that the State put resources where they are not needed and not put resources where they are not needed, so we can do that by going back to our communities and talking to them, we can ultimately control the State in where the funding is going.

Debra Stanley: 

And you raise an excellent point on the roles and responsibilities of keeping your community aware of what is going on.  We had a different administrator last year who and this my opinion, did not believe in community.  And dumped most of the money into health departments and it was dumping, it did not follow the plan, it was very ill conceived.  It took community activism lead by Tony Gillespie who contacted legislatures, mobilizing CDC to get involved, and the project advisor sit down with the Indiana State Department of Health and they reallocated the money, so yes it can happen and Larry is absolutely right, it is our responsibility to go beyond that net, we had written a letter of nonconcurrence but it also took the additional mobilization of the community to write letters, make phone calls, contact the Health Commissioner for things to change.  It was a perfect example of Community in Action.

Ramon Morton: 

And the good thing about that is that this year we wrote a letter of concurrence with reservations, because although not everything changed, we did see some changes.  And in our letter we put CDC on point, we pointed out that they keep doing things to the State that makes it difficult for us to do our work.  They, themselves [CDC] can be a problem to the process.

Sarah Renner:  Rice Auditorium is open for everyone, if they wish to view the Inauguration. 

Ramon Morton: 

Really take the time to read the Guidance and go through the process, we will go through this in detail further.  This guidance is really helpful.

LUNCH AT SOUTH BEND FROM 11:30 – 12:30

Tony Gillespie:  Gives presentation on the Charter By-Laws

The Charter By-Laws are located under TAB 2

  • The Charter By-Laws acts as a co-companion of the CDC guidance.  You will see some information replicated between the two pieces.  These are rules and responsibilities that are specific to the State of Indiana

Highlights from Tony: 

  • Article II is the expanded version of our mission, every meeting we open with the re-statement of our Mission
  • Roles and Responsibilities of all members (voting and non-voting) is located under Article III.  This piece is important, look at number 8:  Evaluate the HIV Prevention Community Planning process and assess the responsiveness and effectiveness of the ISDH’s application in addressing the priorities identified in the Comprehensive HIV Prevention Plan; as Debra was stating after every meeting there is a self-assessment evaluation handed out; it is really important that each CPG member complete that form as it is the only way; other than things that I have discussed throughout the course of the meeting, is to document the strengths, the weaknesses, the whatever of our process.  And that is your opportunity to submit your thoughts or recommendations to the body.  The self evaluation piece is extremely important.  In the past there has not been an even flow of these evaluations.  If you have 20 people in attendance for the CPG meetings and you only receive 10 evaluations back, that is not a snapshot of what the meeting has been about.  Some of the things that we have discussed and will look more into throughout the year is that the evaluation form is not the only way to receive feedback, there are other ways, we have talked about focus groups.  At the end of last year we had a retreat and we talked about a penalty free open meeting and some of those suggestions will be added in for this year.
  • Number 9, as Debra had mentioned our responsibility is to select a community co-chair.
  • Section 2 still under article III………………..

Nate Rush: 

Tony, before you get to far, number 10 talks about Each member will serve on at least one (1) standing committee; will we pick those committees or how does that work?

Ramon Morton: 

The Community Co-Chair places you on them.  The thing is that if and when we place you on a committee and you see something that best fits you, come to me I will try and accommodate you.

Tony Gillespie: 

And there is no reason why a CPG member can not sit on more than one committee.
This year is the first year in a long time or at least since I have been on CPG, that we have had this many Technical Advisors.  We really want to focus on the fact that there are a minimum number of seats for voting members (minimum of 20 and a maximum of 25) but we acknowledge the fact that we do not know everything so we knew we had to recruit individuals from various experience levels.  Technical advisors are extremely important to this process.  This is the first year that we have had this many Technical Advisors, you will definitely have your hands full.
Voting Membership; Article IV, the use of proxy-the rules are now that a CPG member can use two proxies to attend the CPG meeting for you.  A proxy is a voting member that you identify prior to the meeting as permission to represent you at the Community Planning Group meeting.  Article IV also talks about the removal process.

Ryan Nix: 

Correct me if I am wrong, because I wrote this, but when I presented it you miss one you have a proxy if you miss another, even with a proxy you are off.

Ramon Morton:   No, at the time we had 8 meetings, and then we went from 8 to 6.

Ryan Nix:   That was in May, we were at six meetings then.

Ramon Morton: 

There is no way we could possible let people miss four meetings in a year.
This is how it went; if you missed two meetings consecutively, you were out.  You could have a proxy, two absences right next to each other you were out.  We should have done it the way you were talking but we didn’t.

Ryan Nix:  

This needs to be looked at because Section 6; 4a states 2 absences in one year results in a removal.

Dolly Lozano:  

Excuse me; the membership is working on that, so if you want to give input we can discuss that this afternoon.

Mike Exom:  

Are you going to give us the meeting dates?

Cena Bain:  

They are located under tab 7 and we meet every other month.

Tony Gillespie: 

And during orientation is the only time we have a two day meeting unless something significant is occurring like special training etc.
All of our CPG meetings, the Agenda is approved by the Executive Committee.  And if you have something you want on the agenda, you need to speak with someone on the executive committee.  All of our meetings are open to the Public and each of our meetings includes a Public Comment section on our agenda, so everyone has the opportunity to make a comment during our meeting. 
Our decision making process is the consensus process.  If consensus can not be made, we then move to Robert’s Rules of Orders to make decisions.
Conflict of Interest, I will not read that but it is very important to know.  If there is a conflict of interest it needs to be made public to everyone and they need to remove themselves during the voting process if a conflict of interest is present.
Committee is work that is extremely important and can be held via conference call.  We also have the ability to hold face-to-face meetings, we do have those funds.
That is really the jest of the Charter By-Laws.  I do want to bring your attention to the changes; any changes that want to be made to the Charter, CPG voting members must receive 30 days of written notice to the date of the meeting.   This was put in place to ensure that this was an open process and so that members would have a role and be clear on any changes on any recommendations made and so the State would not be accused of making changes to the By-Laws; it is an open process and we all have the opportunity to participate.  One thing that is a challenge is as a member if you don’t read your e-mails and you don’t review the materials prior to coming to the meeting-that is your responsibility. 
It is a lot of work and yes it does not pay the bills, but it is your opportunity to have an impact on the disease and it is something that you agreed to participate in; it is a part of your roles and responsibilities; read your e-mails, ask questions if you don’t understand ask questions.  It is our responsibility to be aware and ask questions.

Wendy Woods: 

This is more of a comment, if you don’t have an e-mail address, let Cena know because she is real good at making sure you have a hard copy.

Tony Gillespie: 

That is an excellent point, if you do not have e-mail access  please let Cena or Ramon know so they can make arrangements to get things to you.

Cena Bain: 

Also, if you can not open attachments, like Miss Wendy, let me know I can forward them in other ways.

Tony Gillespie: 

And if you don’t relay those messages to people, that is your responsibility and that sets your participation in this group and ultimately your value in the process.  If you are just showing up to the meetings and do not know what is going on, we do not need you in this process.

Nate Rush: 

I forget when I left CPG, but we would spend hours catching people up on things, so it is refreshing to know that if you didn’t read your e-mails, just sit back and listen.  That is great.

Larry Pasco: 

I think Chapter 3 should be discussed; Standard Code of Conduct; it talks about no one shall be intoxicated or on drugs.  Some our members are active users.

Debra Stanley: 

I just want to state that this is orientation and not a business meeting, so tomorrow.  Write it down and bring it up tomorrow.

Ramon Morton: 

And that is something that you bring up and then policies and procedures will take over.  If you see something in here that you might want to change; the change comes from the whole body not just one person.

Tony Gillespie: 

I just want to add in terms of composition that two seats from CHSPAC are from CPG; Mike Wallace spoke about the separation between services and prevention one of the things, years ago there was an exploration on how we can combine the two sections; after about 6 months we realized that it was not going to happen.  What was the result of that was that on CPG we created two seats for CHSPAC and CHSPAC created two seats for CPG members, and those who are appointed who relay messages between the two boards.

Ramon Morton: 

We had a person that would sit on CHSPAC and report back to CPG.
Cena, I have a question, it is my understanding that CHSPAC has changed the rules on the person that comes from CPG to CHSPAC?

Cena Bain: 

They didn’t necessarily change the rules, to my understanding and with this said, there is an exception to this meeting because our meetings overlapped, but we will be attending each other’s meeting in efforts to help bridge that gap between services and prevention.  From my understanding, what they have done instead of them having a CPG specific seat they have now a community/CPG seat.  So, with that said their matrix does not really effect us, this is what I told Lisa all our By-Laws say is that we are going to have two CPG representatives there and then you have people on CHSPAC and CPG.  1.  Lisa and I will be relaying information between both boards because we will be attending each other’s meeting plus you will have the two individuals sitting on each other’s seat.  Regardless of what seat they technically fill on CHSPAC, they will still be CPG members.

Jody Grieb: 

On that note, April and I are both on CHSPAC.  So we will be bringing information no matter what.

Cena Bain: 

Right, there are several individuals that sit on both boards.  They are not really changing their rules, they are just changing the name of the seat, which is irrelevant as long as we have CPG representation on CHSPAC and visa versa

Debra Stanley: 

This could be something that can be put on the Agenda for tomorrow.

Ramon Morton:  Okay I will  make a note.

Cena Bain: 

I have something in regards to the By-Laws.  If you look at some of the by-laws you will notice that some sections have italicized notes that cross references the Charter By-Laws with the Policies and Procedures.  And the meeting dates are Tab 7; those are the tentative dates for this year.

Ramon Morton: 

Now we will move down the agenda; the Role of ISDH in regards to CPG.

Sarah Renner: 

I just want to make a couple of comments and then maybe Larry can elaborate when he comes in tomorrow or Cena can pick up where I finish, I do want to explain that we are making some changes internally on who we send to our CPG meetings, we will have staff present being Larry, the Co-Chair, and Cena, Vivian and Elloise, and I will be present if possible.  If we have staff that are TA’s they will attend, but the staff will not attend meetings unless you need them.  They will always be present on floor 6th and they can be easily accessed if we need them but unless we need them they are on the agenda they will not attend the meetings.  We want to prepare for you and we want them to keep doing their jobs during the day and be productive.  It is my direction that we don’t need 20 people listening, we need 15 people working.

Entire Body:  Claps

Sarah Renner: 

We know the objective is the by-laws and that you have a role in our funds and we are going to try and make sure that we follow those objectives and by-laws.  I am going to be pretty well versed on what we can and can not do so I will be very well versed on how I accept your direction.  That is the commitment that the State is making to you.

Tony Gillespie: 

I just wanted to make a comment in regards to roles.  The State Co-chair works hand-in-hand to the community co-chair just in terms of business with CPG, in the last year we have been able to collaboratively work as a group in addressing some of the issues and some of the concerns that plagued our process.  So to Sarah, Cena, Larry and Ramon much to you for allowing us to work together and not argue and fight on about who is on first and who should do what.  For the new CPG members to come into a new and improved group is great.  I think over the years CPG has been like the bad group in terms of addressing issues with the State Department of Health I think we are moving forward and creating more of a partnership.

Sarah Renner: 

I do have comment, do you want to know how I operate a little bit?

It is your right, it is your compliment if you want to pick up the phone and call me, I am here to serve you if you want to e-mail me.  I do believe in communication with staff, they are in charge of their business I hold them accountable, you hold me accountable and I do believe in the chain of command, I mean we have so much to do and we can not get it done unless we follow our chain of command.  Therefore, if you send me an e-mail you can copy me in regards to the program; clearly there are some things that you want only me to see, just make that quite clear when you send me an e-mail and I will know how to handle that.  I am straight forward and communicate with staff so.  You will see things that come back from me with the staff copied on it or the staff will send you direction my behalf.  I make a lot of mistakes and please point them out, this is a learning experience for me so I just wanted you to know how I operate it.

STANDING COMMITTEE INTRODUCTIONS:

Executive Committee

Ramon Morton: 

The executive committee is made up of the committee chairs and one at-large member and the two co-chairs and Miss Cena is on the calls with us.  If you have anything that you want to bring to me before the executive conference call which is the first Monday of every month at 1:30 p.m.  At the first of the month, the first Monday the co-chair call is 12:30 to 1:30 and the committee call is 1:30 to 3:30.  They always have to call me and I am the one that set it up.
 So if have anything that you want us to talk about or be on the agenda because the Executive Committee typically sets the agenda for our next CPG meeting.  You can e-mail me or call me, I will make sure that everyone has my work number and my cell number, do not call me at 1 or 2 o’clock in the morning-MARK (laughs).
 I am going to pass it on to the individual committee chairs.
 What we look at for the different things to go on the agenda and everything that the Executive Committee does is not a secret, it is not a secret organization, we make the decisions and then we bring them back to the full CPG and you as the committee vote on that.

Wendy Woods: 

I just had comment for those of you who do not know what committees he is talking about; there is a page in the manual that explains them.

Cena Bain:  It is in your by-laws, Article VI.

Ramon Morton:  Does anyone have any questions?

Judy Lausch: 

The composition of the CPG, the voting membership are from the regions, I am just wondering how do you decide on who votes.  It says you have 20 to 25 members and 10 from the regions would take up 10 of the 20-25, who decides on the others.

Ramon Morton: 

You have 10 regions and you want to have at least 1 from each region but you may duplicate from each region, like Tony and I are from the same region, but they also represent certain populations.

Ryan Nix: 

You kind of match the epidemic.  Like most of our HIV cases might be in Marion County so most of our members may come from Marion County.

Judy Lausch:  But how do you decide who is who.

Cena Bain:  All members vote.

Ramon Morton: 

All of those with a blue tag vote.  Not the TA’s, they are not voting members.

Judy Lausch:  You know it is not real clear.

Debra Stanley: 

You know we had this discussion not to long ago, it is a combination of, it is not exclusive to.  You will not have one representative and and and, it is a combination of.  And maybe that was the term we were looking for, the CPG is comprise of a COMBINATION of the following.  Because we did struggle with that ourselves.

Judy Lausch:  So are the CHSPAC representatives voting members?

Ramon Morton:  Yes.

Judy Lausch:  Okay.

Epidemiology/Population Committee

Tony Gillespie: 

What that committee does, is develops, defines, and prioritizes populations in order so we can set our final priority process, so each year, part of the State wide plan, The populations committee works closely with the Epidemiologists to develop priorities, it is then presented and accepted by the group.  I think last year we did a major overhaul on our priority populations we when established priorities.  What we did was brought in an external technical assistant in to help develop a priority process that was not solely dependant on numbers so we gave different waves to different locations, socio-economic status, we created a process that encompasses many things in regards to risks.  So that is what the Epi Populations committee does.  In short, the first 6 months we have a lot of work together.  The first part of the year, we have a lot of work to do in ensuring that our work is done and that is a standard set by the Center for Disease Control and that is something that this body must do and after that we are kind of done for the rest of the year.

Interventions Committee

Ramon Morton: 

I will speak for the interventions committee, I was Interventions Chair before I turned Co-Chair, we had an excellent member, Diana Bowden but she had to leave, she had family issues then we had another co-chair and he had to step down, but Interventions Committee the last time what we did is looked at the DEBI’s, it was mandated from the CDC, we looked at the DEBI’s for each priority population because the CDC mandated that any federally funds that were going to be used had to be a DEBI or evidence based intervention.  So we met in Northwest Indiana and pulled out all the DEBI’s for each priority population, one thing that Rico and the committee has started to do was look at a gap analysis and came up with a form throughout the State that also includes interventions that are not funded by the State.  There are some people out there that are doing interventions that are not funded by the State and we don’t know about them.  So what they wanted was to know what kind of interventions people were doing so we can let others know what is going on around the State.

Nate Rush: 

Myself, coming from Chicago, Nashville, Philadelphia, we came together as a group outside to look at some interventions where we saw gaps, until then we had a IRB that looked at a survey that we did that targeted Black males and I did this in Indianapolis, so I wanted to put it out there that this was not something that ISDH did or anybody else did we just came together and developed an IRB process and developed these questions.

Ramon Morton:  So it sounds like I need to you on the Interventions committee.

Nate Rush: 

I am not going to turn my final surveys in, but if anyone is interested in taking some surveys back into their areas, I can give you a five minute block on how do it and get them back to me, if anyone is interested I will bring them in tomorrow.

Ramon Morton:  What is the status on that Rico?

Rico Nash:  Barb is suppose to compile that and send that out electronically.

Ramon Morton: 

Okay.  By tomorrow we should have what committees everyone will be on, I am going to have a quick executive committee after the meeting today.  Cena, Larry, and I will get together and look at the committees and see what they already have and what they  need, what expertise you bring to CPG and what you would bring to each committee.  I also look at the demographics on each committee, I don’t want to have too many MSM’s on one committee.  We want to kind of move everyone around and have a good collective committee.  At the present time, I do not have a chair for the Interventions Committee but I will have that taken care of.

Cena Bain:

I don’t know if you have said this already, if you look in your by laws and read what each committee does and if there is a committee that you would prefer to sit on, let either Ramon or myself know and it is not a guarantee but we will try and put you on that committee.  You will know by the end of tomorrow what committee you will be on.

Needs Assessment Committee

Debra Stanley: Needs assessment which also includes a resource and gap-analysis committee.  This Committee is exactly what it says, a committee that assess the needs of the community as it relates to HIV/AIDS prevention.  In our plan, we also have what we want to assess over a three year period.  We have done stages one and two and we are on the final stage of the process and the focus is currently on the resource inventory and gap analysis.  This is now called the community services assessment in totality.  But the resource inventory and gap analysis have never been done before and that is our focus this year.  I have been begging and recruiting so don’t none of you committee chairs step on my toes [laughs].

Membership Committee

Dolly Lozano: 

Membership Committee and Evaluation committee are combined together.  The membership committee looks at the membership and makes sure that we have representation across the table, we recruit members for CPG with the help from ISDH, address retention and participation (and we are working on the now), replace members as vacancies occur, recommend new members to CPG, meet as needed to handle business, review and revise the application form (and that was done this year), and develop and implement the orientation procedure.
It seems like with the membership committee everything comes down in May and that is when you start working like crazy.  The process of recruitment, when you are looking for members, you are just looking at the representation you don’t know their names.
Now the evaluation committee is new to me we are going to work on a survey were you survey yourself and how have you participated in the process and how you see yourself in regards to the input that you put into the committee.  Our charge is to look at the whole body; it is in the book read it [laughs].  This is new to me and we are trying to develop ways on how we can monitor what we are doing and the effectiveness and how you as a member is working with the body.  You have to be held accountable.

Jim Morgan:

Do I understand that the evaluations is to evaluate this body and it’s production of outputs, then has their been some baseline established in measuring these productions and outputs?

Ramon Morton: 

That is what we are working on.  Because right now the tool that we have is that Self-Assessment form but we have had some discussion on other things that we can do to evaluate the group like focus groups, like Dolly where a person assesses itself.
Let me tell you what happened.  When we did our letter of  noncourrence some things came out of that, we asked for some TA from CDC, but it was not exactly the TA that we had wanted, but it did work out for us because we had the opportunity to look at some of the feedback and look at some of the things that we wanted and some of those things are that we needed to streamline some of our committees, we needed to break down some of our committees, we had too many standing committees, we made some of our committees Ad Hoc, like STD.  We looked at the things that the membership committee did and said that the membership committee is the best place to put evaluations.  So right now I will put you as TA on that committee.

Jim Morgan: 

Hang on there is more, well the follow up to that is then has this body developed a performance plan for the end of the year?  An actual performance plan, what it is exactly that this body is wanting to accomplish at the end of the year?

Cena Bain: 

Well we have a timeline, and also tomorrow we will be talking about what everyone’s personal goals for the CPG body, we are working on, the membership committee is working on specific things, i.e. participation.  We have standing meetings and as a CPG member you are required to attend those standing committee meetings outside of the CPG meetings, if you are not attending those meetings, then you are not participating.  So we are looking at ways to measure those required actions.

Jim Morgan: 

Well that addresses those individual requirements, but that does not look at the total group product.  And that performance plan that I was talking about is looking at the total body and what they plan to accomplish in a particular time, is there a process where that takes place?

Ramon Morton: 

That is why I said, this is a business thing and we will discuss this tomorrow, I have you down for tomorrow.  Rico had his hand up.

Rico Nash: 

I just wanted to add to the interventions committee, we also look at external entities. 

April Grudi: 

When you were talking about performance plan, and I could be wrong, but I think you were talking about the timeline.

Jim Morgan: 

Well you had talked about this in December at your retreat.

Nate Rush: 

Well I guess what impact did you have on HIV, is CPG impacting this disease, like Mike was saying, are we still relevant.  Is there a way to evaluate that.

Debra Stanley: 

We look at the continue rise in HIV and boom, here is our effectiveness.  Which is why we have been calling for clear delineation priority populations in trying to assist, we have to work harder, we have to put more effort into how we do things, everything that we have is too broad, we have everything in place and it is just out there.  We have not done the work to where people in the communities can have the appropriate tool to say um this is what I should be doing in my own back yard.  So, that is why I am just so hopeful for all of these people at the table today.  We have fresh blood creative minds and folks asking questions on day one.  Thank You.  Okay.

Tony Gillespie: 

I just wanted to answer Jim’s question.  And the answer is no.  We have collected baseline data but it has never been compiles or analyzed.  Nothing has been documented that has measured our process.  We have these self-assessment forms but they have never been put into useful forms.  That is why we have had some discussions about other forms.

Ramon Morton: 

And that is why, some of the feedback is just bad.  Like are there hidden agendas and somebody put “some”, what does “some mean”  And that is why I am glad that Sarah has removed some ISDH staff you have a lot of issues that come up and people don’t want to speak to them because they feel like that since these people are here and they are involved in some of the issues that come up.  I think that is a wonderful thing what she has done so far by removing some of those people, we have our State people and we are able to use your voice.  And I don’t think what the self-assessment form is used for; we have broken it down a couple of times and some people have asked questions and your right there are some other ways to self assess.  This process can be better.  I want to give kudos to you because during the application process in the past there were just blank lines but you really told us who you were and what it is that you do and what you can bring to this process.  And we really spent hours working on that.  I am not even a part of the membership committee but Dolly was ill so I stepped in and I feel that as the community co-chair that is what I am suppose to do.  So if there is something going on in your committee call me, because I am here to work with you.  I think this is wonderful, we have gotten a lot of stuff from you today that I didn’t think we were going to get.  You all have started working already.

Ryan Nix: 

I did want to say this and this kind of goes to the executive committee that even though there is no data I don’t want the new members to think that they are filling out the self-assessment forms for no reason because the executive committee spends a huge part of their conference call going over that self-assessment form.  And although we do not have this performance thing yet; hopefully we will have that your evaluation is useless because the executive committee sits a looks and says “okay this went wrong and this is how we can make it better”  So do not think that you are filling out this self-assessment form for no reason.

Cena Bain: 

And like Ramon was saying, just putting that you somewhat disagree doesn’t help us, the executive committee can not even address that situation so if you don’t agree with something you need to state a reason why and they are anonymous.

Tony Gillespie: 

And this self-assessment piece is only one way, we are required to by CDC to evaluate our process and that is it and using the self-assessment form is fine, but it has just been the desire of this body to go one step further to truly a do comprehensive evaluation.

AD HOC COMMITTEE INTRODUCTIONS

STD Committee

Dolly Lozano: 

STD’s are in charge of bringing information on STD’s and how it correlates with HIV infection and to keep this body abreast on any types of tools that is going on in the STD’s field.  What I have been doing is if I get anything from ISDH regarding STD’s I forward it to Cena and try to get it out to everybody.  Like right now is syphilis, it use to just be in Marion County and now I believe all the counties in Indiana have cases of syphilis it is hitting the Northern part of the State, Elkhart only had one case of primary syphilis.  When you have syphilis if you start seeing a rise in syphilis in the next 3 to 5 years you start seeing a rise in HIV cases, that is why when you are prevention education never ever forget about those STD’s.  I like doing STD’s

Ramon Morton: 

Any questions about STD’s, that is one of our AD Hoc committees that do not meet all the time.

Policies and Procedure Committee

Ramon Morton: 

That is Ryan and he had to leave, but basically they look at the policies and procedures once or twice a year.  They go back and look at needs, like I think tomorrow membership is going to bring some things up about attendance and things, so this committee works hand-in-hand with the membership committee.  Ryan will work on that committee.

Budget Committee

Ramon Morton: 

We lost our Budget Committee chair he, and he was pretty accurate, what the budget committee does is look over CPG funds and make sure the funds are being used adequately.  The chair pretty much works straight with Cena.  If anyone would be interested in working with the Budget Committee just let me know.

Jody Grieb:  I would.

Ramon Morton:  Thanks Jody, okay.

Advocacy Committee

Tony Gillespie: 

The advocacy committee, the description is there but primarily what the advocacy committee does is address national issues and researcher information to disseminate to the entire group to stop the spread of HIV and to look at policies and systemic changes.  Debra eluded to the fact that although there was not an advocacy committee then, but with the funding recommendations that were made from the division that did not really follow the disease or really follow logic in terms of our recommendations to fund portions of the State that carried a less of a disease burden and failed to fund portions of the State that did carry more of a disease burden and that did not follow logic and it was not transparent.  So just in terms of mobilizing and working with legislatures external to this process is what this is all about.  One of the things that is an ongoing struggle with advocacy is that the context of the Community Planning Group that you get questions raised like you can’t talk to legislatures or this is the State Department of Health and you are not suppose to have any conversations with them on policies; as community members no matter what hat you wear it is our duty to speak and educate our legislatures and that has nothing to do with funding it has nothing to do with the State Department of Health it has everything to do with actively addressing HIV and AIDS prevention services.  It has also been a policy issue and that is the duty of this committee to do that.
 Later on in the process, we hope to bring someone in to discuss what advocacy is and what it is not.  It is our responsibility to educate our legislatures. 

Larry Pasco: 

One of things that we did do was issue a paper on needle exchange.  We put that together for the Commissioner of Health and the former Division Director had a 15 minute meeting with the Commissioner of and that is something we did as an advocacy committee.  It did not go very far, but I am glad that they supported the efforts.

Tony Gillespie: 

And although it did not go very far, we requested that she read it and make a definitive answer yah or nah on whether or not she would support, and well we got our answer and it was no, but there are a number of other national [inaudible] that we can use and will be looking at that over the next year, the whole national movement of harm reduction and needle exchange and although it can not be funded with federal funds it can be funded with State funds so it is an ongoing education on legislation and policy makers and needle exchange is just one of the issues that we can look at.

Larry Pasco: 

I just want to share one thing then I will shut up; Obama has said publicly and his health directors have said that they are going to issue an executive order lifting the ban and it should take about a year or 18 months to get the federal funds that he needs.

Jody Grieb:  I am trying to figure out what the issue is on the Needle Exchange

Larry Pasco: 

Right now you can not spend federal dollars, CDC money on needle exchange.  Since all the money that comes in from the State for prevention is CDC money we [harm reduction] don’t get money for prevention  in this State, the federal ban that states that you can not use federal dollars to buy or distribute needles in the State of Indiana.  Once this ban is lifted, there is no reason why the State can not use state dollars.

Jody Grieb: 

I know I run 5 needle exchange programs right now in the State of Indiana.

Larry Pasco: 

 I run the largest needle exchange program in the State.

Jody Grieb: 

You will never get federal money for it; you have got to find another source.

Ramon Morton: 

That has been an ongoing issue CPG does support needle exchange and found that is proven that it works, so one of the positions that we took is that we do support that.  And like Tony said we did submit our position to Dr. Monroe and asked her what her stance was, we showed her all of the information; it was beautiful, I hope you all get to read it.  And she gave us her answer and it was no, but that has been an ongoing issue.  We can not change the laws, but we can advocate on certain things and to let legislature know.  A lot of times when they go to pass a law on HIV they have not even talked to anyone about HIV beforehand.  It is our job to let these people know.

Tony Gillespie: 

One of the unofficial goals of the advocacy committee is to have everyone know their representatives and their congress person and to have a meeting in their district office to discuss HIV and HIV prevention.

Ramon Morton: 

Okay that is it on the committees; and that is something that we will do throughout the year is to establish regional goals.  This body is important but we can make a difference in our communities.  We need to reach out to people in our community with those who work in the field.  The purpose of this is to go back to your community and act as a vessel, as an instrument to your community.  And we need to come back here and speak to the State and make sure the funds are going to where they need to be.
You can do more in your community then we can do here.  But that is what you have to do is come here and take it back to your community.  Do not just come here every other month and not take it back to your community.  We can not do it here sitting at this table, the actions have to happen outside of here.
Even the committees, people can work on the committees without being a voting member to this group.  If you know someone that is good at gap analysis or resource they can help you during your committees during the meeting.

Judy Lausch: 

I have a general question; could you just tell me how this committee is funded?

Ramon Morton:  The CDC.

Judy Lausch:  Through grants?

Cena Bain:  Yes, we apply and have to meet certain requirements.

Judy Lausch: 

Well you talked about taking to regional levels, and I am wondering how this fits into the equation.

Cena Bain: 

The CDC’s requirement states that it does not have to specifically be statewide, it just has to be community planning group, whether it is regionally or statewide, so it gives each state the leeway to do it how they want. 

Judy Lausch: 

I would just think that CDC would be the ones to determine if regional meetings are appropriate.

Cena Bain: 

Well the CDC does not specify how you do it; the final product is what they are concerned about.  They want a statewide plan.  So they give you the money and you decide on what works best for your State.  You just have to factor that into your funding.

Judy Lausch: 

I am just trying to get a hold on how everything works.

Ramon Morton: 

One of the things that I have felt is when we talk about funding that when you are working in the area, you are paying for a meeting place, not mileage or per diem, so they actually can be more cost effective.  The whole thing is to really be able to access your community. 

Dolly Lozano: 

If anyone wants to discuss regional meetings further you can provide input to the membership committee.

TECHNICAL ADVISOR INTRODUCTIONS

INTRODUCTION TO THE CPG MANUAL

Cena Bain: 

What I am going to talk about is your manual and my role as your liaison.  Basically I am the bridge between you and the State.  I am a State employee; however, I am here for you.  You guys are here without pay, and I am here being paid so with that said for anything that you guys need I am here to hopefully get it for you.  I am here to work and since I am the bridge, no other State Department of Health staff will be here.  If you need something from one of the other staff, you need to contact me first; I will get that information for you.  Part of your issue last year was a tracking system, if I do not know about it, it can not be tracked.  If you need something from someone, contact me first.  All Department of Health staff has been notified even if this rule is not followed, they know and they will forward the information to me so that I know, but if you could just make it go to me first so it would just make it a lot easier.  With this said, the tracking report has been developed, really everything needs to be in writing, it is like a CYA kind of thing, we want to make sure that it gets to the right person and that it actually gets done, things do get lost in the shuffle and we all need to recognize that, we all have other lives, you guys have your other lives and I have two kids at home and I leave at four.  TAB 8, I have developed a mock tracking report. I will provide this electronically if there is something that you want from me or someone else from CPG and you are unable to contact them for any reason, I will make sure that it gets done.  This is so that at the end of the year we can look at this and make sure that all needs are met.
It has been stated throughout the day that this manual is your bible for CPG and that is very true.  I have my own binder, I started here in July and I have made some changes since then and I have kept track of everything.  Since I have started, most people have been able to contact me with a request and I have been able to get it to them quite quickly within 24 hours at the very least.
Tab 1 is a reference, all the contact information for all the members and technical advisors are here.  In October there was a request for an new acronym guide, I completed one and it is included.
Tab 2 is your charter by-laws, Tab 3 is your policies, Tabs 4 and 5 are your guide, Tab 6 is your regions and priority populations, Tab 7 is your 2009 timeline, meeting dates, ground rules, Tab 9 is your tracking report, and sample forms.  Here is the bottom line, if you don’t tell me you need a room, you are not getting one, it is that simple.  Vivian or I will no longer be calling you individually to verify if you need a room.  You can not submit your RSVP then you will be responsible for getting your own room, you will be reimbursed for travel and there are travel requirements, it is 50 miles or more, so if you travel more than 50 miles then you are entitled to a room, and you will be reimbursed for lunch and dinner.  Breakfast will not reimbursed because it is provided at the hotel, although it is a “janky” breakfast Miss Debra, it is still included in the hotel.

Ramona Gilmore:  Do you get reimbursed for lunch or dinner?

Cena Bain:  Both

Ramona Gilmore:  

I have never been reimbursed for lunch, I was always told to pack a lunch.

Debra Stanley: 

The State has a guideline in terms of time on what meals are covered.  If you leave during a specific time frame that is when meals are covered.

Cena Bain: 

Those who have submitted a receipt for lunch, thus far I have reimbursed them and I have not been denied.  If that changes I will let you know.
If you do not submit your travel I am not going to hound you about it, I do not have time to do that.  I check it, sign off on it and pass it down the line.

Nate Rush:  Do you get reimbursed for local parking?

Cena Bain:  It is only up to $8.

Mark Hughes:  $8, it is more than that.

Cena Bain: 

The problem is we are mandated by State policy, it is not CPG policy.  You can vote but it will not change State policy.  If the State says $8, then that is all you will get reimbursed for.
Your travel is in your manual; we have a sheet that tells us what the mileage is.  So if your odometer says that something is 54 miles but our sheet says 52, I will submit the 54 miles, but there is no guarantee that you will get the 54, I may have to adjust and submit it for 52, they have literally drove to these places and given me the miles and it might delay your money.
What Miss Vivian has done, if you are eligible for travel, Miss Vivian has plugged in your numbers for you, you will get $.44 per mile, and she will add that in.  Please turn in your travel sheets before you leave.  You are eligible for reimbursement for meetings with your standing committees if you are over the 50 mile range.
Always remember your receipt, if you forget it there is a certificate for missing receipt.
The rest of your manual is for you to use, you will get copies of the minutes from each meeting.  The additional tabs are for you to keep track of everything.
And tomorrow's meeting is in Rice so we will have more room.

Ramon Morton: 

We have not adjourned yet; one thing we will talk about is staying through the whole meeting.  If we can, when you are at this meeting try and stay through the whole meeting.
We have been finishing early, because you should be reviewing them before you come to the meeting.  Please try and stay dedicated to the process.

Adjourn at 3:45 p.m.

NEXT MEETING ON JANUARY 21 AT 10:00 A.M.