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Indiana State Department of Health

Tobacco Prevention & Cessation > Evaluation & Research > Facts for Life Facts for Life

Facts for Life: 2003

  • ITPC Fact for Life #1
    5/1/2003
    Direct healthcare of smoking-related illnesses costs Indiana $1.6 BILLION annually.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #2
    5/8/2003
    Tobacco kills more people than alcohol, AIDS, car accidents, illegal drugs, murderers and suicides combined.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #3
    5/15/2003
    Indiana spent $2.3 BILLION in Medicaid in 1998. 16.3% of that was related to smoking, equaling $380 million.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #4
    5/22/2003
    Tobacco kills more than one Hoosier every hour. That's 28 Hoosiers every day or 10,300 every year.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #5
    5/29/2003
    If Indiana's smoking rate is reduced by 25%, it will save Indiana tax payers over $20 million per year in smoking-related Medicaid costs.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #6
    6/5/2003
    Youth prevention efforts are a high priority for ITPC. One percentage point drop in Indiana's smoking rate means 5,230 youths never getting addicted to cigarettes. ITPC created a youth-led movement against tobacco use. Indiana youth named their movement, VOICE.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #7
    6/12/2003
    A recent survey determined that adults who have seen at least 1 ITPC television ad are 67% more likely to agree that tobacco is dangerous and addictive than those who did not see the ad.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #8
    6/19/2003
    ITPC has awarded over $16 million in partnership grants to local organizations in all 92 counties, including minority partners in 22 counties and 20 statewide partners.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #9
    6/26/2003
    ITPC helps Indiana stay physically and fiscally fit.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #10
    7/3/2003
    193,000 Hoosiers are celebrating the fact that they quit smoking last year and are no longer addicted to cigarettes.

    Source: "Adult Tobacco Survey, 2002, ITPC"

  • ITPC Fact for Life #11
    7/10/2003
    All properly designed economic research studies on smoke free restaurants and bar laws report no impact or demonstrate positive impact on sales or employment.

    Source: Tobacco Control 2003, 12: 13-20; www.no-smoke.org/advo.html

  • ITPC Fact for Life #12
    7/17/2003
    If current trends continue, an estimated 1.6 million African Americans in the U.S. who are now under the age of 18 years will become regular smokers. About 500,000 of those smokers will die of a smoking-related disease.

    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At-A-Glance. Tobacco Use Among U.S. Racial/Ethnic Minority Groups - African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics, Atlanta: CDC, 1998.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #13
    7/24/2003
    In 2001, tobacco company spending for advertising its deadly products in Indiana topped $239 million. That is more than $650,000 each day.

    Source: 2001 Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Cigarette Report, released June 2003.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #14
    8/1/2003
    Indiana ranks 49th in the nation with 58% of workers whose employer had an official workplace policy restricting smoking.

    Source: State-specific trends in smoke-free workplace policy coverage. The Current Population Survey Tobacco Use Supplement, 1993 to 1999, National Cancer Institute.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #15
    8/11/2003
    Over 50 counties in Indiana had special tobacco free days, events and booths during this summer's county-fair season. Congratulations to Huntington County Fair Board who made the decision to make their week long county fair totally smokefree.

    Source: ITPC

  • ITPC Fact for Life #16
    8/14/2003
    Are Hoosier youth missing school because of asthma? Then check out their exposure to secondhand smoke. Nearly 60% of middle school and 75% of high school students reported being in the same room as someone who was smoking cigarettes in the past 7 days.

    Source: 2000 Indiana Youth Tobacco Survey

  • ITPC Fact for Life #17
    8/22/2003
    Education makes a difference in smoking rates. Hoosiers that have less than a high school education smoke a greater rate than those with high school or college degrees. Less than high school education- 42% of Hoosiers smoke High School degree- 33% Some college training- 27% College degree- 14%.

    Source: 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey

  • ITPC Fact for Life #18
    9/4/2003
    Indiana ranks 49th in the nation with 58% of workers whose employer had an official workplace policy regarding smoking.

    Source: State-specific trends in smoke-free workplace policy coverage. The Current Population Survey Tobacco Use Supplement, 1993 to 1999, National Cancer Institute.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #19
    9/12/2003
    If one parent quits smoking before their child is 8 or 9 years old, their child’s odds of being a regular smoker decreases by 25 percent. If both parents quit, the odds go down to 40 percent.

    Source: Study at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Addiction Journal

  • ITPC Fact for Life #20
    9/26/2003
    If all smokers quit by the time their children turn 8, as many as 136,000 teenagers in the United States could be prevented from becoming daily smokers.

    Source: Study at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Addiction Journal

  • ITPC Fact for Life #21
    10/2/2003
    About 8.6 million people in the United States have at least one serious illness caused by smoking.

    Source: CDC, MMWR, September 5, 2003/52 (35); 842-844

  • ITPC Fact for Life #22
    10/10/2003
    For every person who dies of a smoking attributable disease, there are 20 more people suffering with at least one serious illness from smoking.

    Source: CDC, MMWR, September 5, 2003/52 (35); 842-844

  • ITPC Fact for Life #23
    10/17/2003
    The return on investment in tobacco prevention is high. California found that for every $1 spent on tobacco control, the state saved $3.50 in direct health care costs and another $6 in indirect costs.

    Source: California Department of Health Services, Tobacco Control Section, California Tobacco Control Update, August 2000, http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/96/4/1089.


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Facts for Life: 2004

  • ITPC Fact for Life #24
    1/8/2004
    ITPC wishes you a healthy, happy and smoke free New Year! If you would like help quitting smoking, call our toll free number for a free packet on how to quit. 1-866-515-LIFE.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #25
    1/15/2004
    Men ages 40 to 44 who are heavy smokers will generate an average of more than $56,000 in additional costs of illness during their lifetime. For women, these costs will be more than $19,000.

    Source: American Cancer Society fact sheet, “Smoking in the Workplace Costs You Money”

  • ITPC Fact for Life #26
    1/22/2004
    A study of over 3,000 Xerox employees found that smoking is one of the most costly individual health risks. Workers’ compensation costs for a smoker averaged $2,189 compared to only $176 for a nonsmoker.

    Source: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, July 2001

  • ITPC Fact for Life #27
    1/30/2004
    Successfully helping one smoker to quit reduces the anticipated medical costs associated with heart attack and stroke by $47 in the first year and by $853 during the next seven years.

    Source: Circulation

  • ITPC Fact for Life #28
    2/6/2004
    A recent study of 300 booking clerks at a large U.S. airline found that smokers are absent from work for sickness as many as 6.16 days per year on average, compared with 3.86 days for those who never smoke.

    Source: Tobacco Control, September 2001

  • ITPC Fact for Life #29
    2/13/2004
    Health and fire insurance premiums can be 25% to 35% lower for smoke free businesses, and morbidity and fire statistics suggest that premium discounts should be as high as 70%.

    Source: Dr. William L. Weis, Associate Professor of Business Administration, Albert School of Business, Seattle University

  • ITPC Fact for Life #30
    2/20/2004
    The number of Hoosier retailers selling cigarettes illegally to minors has dropped 62 percent, down to 11% in December 2003 from 29% in October 2001. Indiana's vigorous efforts to prevent minors from gaining access to tobacco products, helps the state maintain compliance with the Federal Synar Act, thus saving the state $13 million in federal funds.

    Source: Indiana Tobacco Prevention and Cessation and the Alcohol and Tobacco Commission

  • ITPC Fact for Life #31
    2/26/2004
    Cigarette ads appearing during Black History Month and featuring pictures or quotations of prominent African-American leaders are one example of the tobacco industry’s targeted marketing tactics that includes promoting events and rituals highly regarded within a community.

    Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Tobacco Use Among U.S. Racial/Ethnic Minority Groups - African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1998.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #32
    3/4/2004
    Despite increasing public understanding of the dangers of smoking, smoking in movies is as dominant now as it was in 1950, when smoking was nearly twice as prevalent in reality as it was in 2002.

    Source: http://www.hbns.org/news/movies02-24-04.cfm

  • ITPC Fact for Life #33
    3/12/2004
    Philip Morris USA has run youth smoking prevention advertising campaigns, yet at least one of these campaigns has influenced teen attitudes toward smoking - in the wrong direction.

    Source: Getting to the Truth: Evaluating National Tobacco Counter-marketing Campaigns. American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 92(6), 2002.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #34
    3/18/2004
    On March 29, 2004, Ireland begins implementation of its tobacco ban, making it the first country in Europe to outlaw smoking in pubs, bars and restaurants. If Ireland can go smoke free - why can't we?

    Source: http://news.tobaccofreekids.org/plugin.jtml?siteID=TFKNEWS&p=1

  • ITPC Fact for Life #35
    3/24/2004
    Lung cancer is the leading cancer killer of women; surpassing breast cancer in 1987.

    Source: American Cancer Society, Surveillance Research 1999; National Center for Health Statistics; Vital Statistics of the United States 1998.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #36
    4/1/2004
    Lung cancer is the leading cancer killer of women; surpassing breast cancer in 1987.

    Source: American Cancer Society, Surveillance Research 1999; National Center for Health Statistics; Vital Statistics of the United States 1998.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #37
    4/13/2004
    In 2000, the number of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) deaths in women exceeded those in men for the first time. About 90% of COPD deaths to women are attributed to smoking.

    Source: CDC, National Center for Environmental Health, Facts About COPD, August 2003; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Women and Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General, 2001.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #38
    4/23/2004
    Food service workers who are not covered by smoke free workplace laws, yet who are themselves non-smokers, could still experience a 50 percent greater lung cancer rate than the general population.

    Source: Siegel M. "Involuntary smoking in the restaurant workplace: A review of employee exposure and health effects." Journal of the American Medical Association. 1993;270:490-493.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #39
    4/30/2004
    During the first six months following passage of a smoke free ordinance for bars and restaurants in Helena, MT, area hospitals noticed a 40% drop in admissions for heart attacks among people who live or work in the city.

    Source: Sargent, R. Shephard, R. Glantz, S. "Reduced incidence of admissions for myocardial infarction associated with public smoking ban: before and after study." British Medical Journal, 04/05/2004, www.bmj.com

  • ITPC Fact for Life #40
    5/7/2004
    Mother's Day celebrates moms and all the wonderful things they do for their children. Unfortunately, 1 in 5 pregnant women in Indiana smoke, and 1,800 Hoosier children have lost their moms to smoking.

    Source: 2002 Indiana Birth Certificate Data; Leistikow, B., et. Al., "Estimates of Smoking-Attributable Deaths at Ages 15-54, Motherless or Fatherless Youths, and Resulting Social Security Costs in the United States in 1994," Preventive Medicine 30(5): 353-360, (May 2000).

  • ITPC Fact for Life #41
    5/14/2004
    A study of more than 500 college students showed that nearly 90% of daily smokers and nearly 50% of occasional or social smokers continue smoking at least four years after graduation.

    Source: "Prevalence and predictors of transitions in smoking behavior among college students." Wetter DW et al. Health Psychology 2004 Mar;23(2); 168-77

  • ITPC Fact for Life #42
    5/21/2004
    Brown and Williamson, the makers of Kool cigarettes, has introduced a series of flavored, mentholated cigarettes in special packs called "Smooth Fusions". Research shows that youth and African Americans prefer flavored cigarettes. In Indiana, 44% of all youth smokers and 62% of all youth African American smokers smoke mentholated cigarettes.

    Source: Brown & Williamson Tobacco Company, 2002 Indiana Youth Tobacco Survey

  • ITPC Fact for Life #43
    5/28/2004
    In New York City, the successful combination of a smoke-free workplace policy, increased cigarette taxes and a statewide media campaign has resulted in an astonishing 11 percent drop in adult smoking in a single year.

    Source: 2004 City of New York annual community health survey.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #44
    6/3/2004
    Last week, the U.S. Surgeon General's latest report revealed for the first time that smoking causes diseases in nearly every organ of the body, and conclusively linked tobacco use to diseases such as leukemia, cataracts, pneumonia, periodontitis and cancers of the cervix, kidney, pancreas and stomach.

    Source: 28th U.S. Surgeon General's report on tobacco use, www.cdc.gov/tobacco/sgr/sgr_2004

  • ITPC Fact for Life #45
    6/11/2004
    One in five of the more than six million food service workers in the U.S. is a teenager. Forty-three percent of those workers are not covered by smoke-free workplace policies. Food service workers account for the fourth highest number of all U.S. employees.

    Source: "Disparities in Smoke-free Workplace Policies Among Food Service Workers,” Journal of Occupation and Environmental Medicine, April 2004.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #46
    6/17/2004
    Father's Day celebrates dads and all the wonderful things they do for their children. Unfortunately, every year, more than 600 Hoosier youth lose their fathers to smoking-related diseases.

    Source: Leistikow, B., et. al., "Estimates of Smoking-Attributable Deaths at Ages 15-54, Motherless or Fatherless Youths, and Resulting Social Security Costs in the United States in 1994," Preventive Medicine, 30(5): 353-360, (May 2000).

  • ITPC Fact for Life #47
    6/25/2004
    The economic costs of smoking are estimated to be about $3,391 per smoker per year.

    Source: Annual Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Years of Potential Life Lost, and Economic Costs --- United States, 1995-1999, US Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly, April 12, 2002 / 51(14);300-3.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #48
    7/2/2004
    More than 30% of Hoosier children aged 0-14 are exposed to secondhand smoke in their homes. Indiana spends $8.9 million to treat children for 11,022 asthma cases linked to exposure to secondhand smoke.

    Source: Secondhand Smoke Tearing Families Apart. The American Legacy Foundation. June 2004.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #49
    7/9/2004
    Kentucky, with the highest adult smoking rate in the U.S. and the second largest producer of tobacco crops, succeeded in passing a smoke-free ordinance for all bars and restaurants in Lexington - the state's second largest city and the hub of the burley tobacco belt.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #50
    7/16/2004
    A recent study found that African-American men have the highest cancer burden in the U.S. This excessive cancer burden is linked to smoking. Cancer death rates among African-American males would decline by two-thirds if their exposure to secondhand smoke were eliminated.

    Source: "Lung cancer death rates as an index of smoke exposures: validation against black male non-lung cancer death rates," 1969-2000. Preventive Medicine, 38 (2004) 511-515.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #51
    7/23/2004
    Confirmed awareness of Indiana's anti-tobacco media campaign has steadily increased since 2002. In 2004, nearly 80% of adults and youth reported seeing at least one ITPC advertisement, with television ads as the most recognized medium.

    Source: ITPC media tracking surveys, 2002-2004.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #52
    7/30/2004
    Hoosier adults who confirmed seeing an advertisement from ITPC's media campaign were 56% more likely to agree that secondhand smoke is a serious problem and that indoor workplaces should be smoke free.

    Source: ITPC media tracking surveys, 2002-2004.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #53
    8/6/2004
    Cigarette-caused fires are the nation’s number one cause of fire death, annually responsible for 1,000 fatalities and 3,000 critical injuries, as well as $4 billion in property damage. More than one-third of cigarette-related fire injuries and deaths occur in innocent children and adults who do not smoke.

    Source: www.gasp.org/firesafe.html

  • ITPC Fact for Life #54
    8/27/2004
    Sixty-six (66) of Indiana’s counties had special tobacco free days, events and booths during this summer's county-fair season. The Indiana State Fair celebrated its 3rd annual tobacco free day on August 17th!

    Source: ITPC

  • ITPC Fact for Life #55
    9/3/2004
    Currently 47 percent of Indiana’s youth in public schools are protected from secondhand smoke through a tobacco-free school campus policy.

    Source: ITPC policy tracking-July 2004

  • ITPC Fact for Life #56
    9/10/2004
    Three out of four high school students and 61 percent of middle school students reported being in the same room with someone who was smoking during the seven days prior to the study.

    Source: 2002 Indiana Youth Tobacco Survey

  • ITPC Fact for Life #57
    9/17/2004
    For every pack of cigarettes sold in Indiana, Hoosiers spend $5.73 in smoking-related medical costs and job productivity losses due to smoking.

    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Data Highlights-2004

  • ITPC Fact for Life #58
    9/24/2004
    Less than half (43 percent) of the nation’s food preparation and service employees and just 52 percent of all blue-collar workers are covered by smoke-free workplace policies, while more than 75 percent of white collar workers are covered.

    Source: "Disparities in Smoke-free Workplace Policies Among Food Service Workers,” Journal of Occupation and Environmental Medicine , April 2004.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #59
    10/1/2004
    A new study found that employees working in smoke-filled hospitality venues breathe air that is in violation of federal air quality standards, where pollution levels were 4.6 times higher than permissible standards and nearly 20 times greater than outdoor air.

    Source: “Respirable Particles and Carcinogens in the Air of Delaware Hospitality Venues Before and After a Smoking Ban.” Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine . 46(9):887-905, September 2004

  • ITPC Fact for Life #60
    10/15/2004
    ITPC local partners conducted over 10,200 activities at the community level, such as implementing prevention and education programs in schools, developing cessation networks, working to protect Hoosiers from secondhand smoke, engaging local businesses, and raising awareness of tobacco prevention efforts.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #61
    10/22/2004
    Adult smokers who have seen an ITPC television advertisement were twice as likely to try to quit smoking.

    Source: 2004 ITPC Adult Media Tracking Survey.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #62
    10/29/2004
    Hoosier youth who have seen an ITPC advertisement were 59 percent more likely to understand that tobacco is addictive and dangerous, compared to those not exposed to any ITPC advertisements.

    Source: 2004 ITPC Youth Media Tracking Survey.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #63
    11/5/2004
    ITPC local partners in all 92 counties participated in nearly 900 state and local tobacco control training activities in State Fiscal Years 2003 and 2004.

    Source: ITPC Program Tracking System, State Fiscal Years 2003 and 2004.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #64
    11/12/2004
    Smoke-free laws boost property values: a recent study found a median 16 percent increase in the sale price of a restaurant in a smoke-free jurisdiction, over the sale price of a comparable restaurant in a community without a law for smoke-free public places.

    Source: Journal of Contemporary Economic Policy, http://cep.oupjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/22/4/520

  • ITPC Fact for Life #65
    11/19/2004
    People under 40 are 5 times more likely to suffer a heart attack if they smoke. In a recent study, tobacco use was responsible for two-thirds of non-fatal heart attacks in men, and for over half in women, aged between 35 and 39.

    Source: “Current smoking and the risk of non-fatal myocardial infarction in the WHO MONICA Project populations,” Tobacco Control 2004;13:244-250

  • ITPC Fact for Life #66
    12/3/2004
    The tobacco industry claims to advocate and work toward prevention of youth smoking. In 2002, however, the industry spent $74 million on youth prevention programs, only one-half of one percent (0.6%) of a total $12.5 billion spent on advertising and product promotions to recruit new smokers.

    Source: 2002 Federal Trade Commission Report

  • ITPC Fact for Life #67
    12/10/2004
    Each day, more than 1,000 teens try their first cigarette because of smoking in the movies. Eighty-two percent (82%) of PG-13 films feature smoking.

    Source: Dalton, M.A., Sargent, J.D., et. al (2003) "Effect of viewing smoking in movies on adolescent smoking initiation: A cohort study." The Lancet , 362(9380):281-285. www.smokefreemovies.ucsf.edu

  • ITPC Fact for Life #68
    12/22/2004
    Women exposed to environmental tobacco smoke are 2.6 times more likely to contract breast cancer, according to a national population study on women in their 40s and 50s.

    Source: S. Tsugane, Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare

  • ITPC Fact for Life #69
    12/30/2004
    ITPC wishes you a healthy, happy and smoke free New Year! If you would like help quitting smoking, call our toll free number for a free packet on how to quit. 1-866-515-LIFE.


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Facts for Life: 2005

  • ITPC Fact for Life #70
    1/7/2005
    A new study reveals a strong negative relationship between secondhand smoke exposure and a child's skill levels in reading, math and reasoning. 33 million American children are experiencing problems with reading, due to secondhand smoke exposure.

    Source: Yolton et al. "Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and cognitive abilities among U.S. children and adolescents." Environmental Health Perspectives ; Vol 113, No.1, January 2005.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #71
    1/14/2005
    Indiana teens who are aware of VOICE - Indiana's youth movement against the tobacco industry - are nearly 1.5 times more likely to knowledgeable of the dangers of tobacco use.

    Source: 2004 Indiana Media Tracking Survey

  • ITPC Fact for Life #72
    1/21/2005
    A nationwide survey of students in grades 8-12 showed that 65 percent of youth smokers reported having friends or family members buy cigarettes for them.

    Source: “Methods, locations, and ease of cigarette access for American youth, 1997-2002.” American Journal of Preventive Medicine , 27(4): 267-276, 2004.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #73
    1/29/2005
    Indiana would prevent 55,870 kids alive today from starting to smoke if it funded a tobacco prevention and cessation program at the minimum level recommended by CDC.

    Source: Tauras, JA, et al., "State Tobacco Control Spending and Youth Smoking," American Journal of Public Health , Feb 2005; Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids http://tobaccofreekids.org/research/factsheets/pdf/0273.pdf

  • ITPC Fact for Life #74
    2/4/2005
    Simply quitting smoking during pregnancy is not enough to protect your baby. Exposure to secondhand smoke has been shown to slow fetal growth, induce premature delivery and increase the risk of miscarriage.

    Source: Martin K et al. “Environmental Tobacco Smoke and Pregnancy Outcome,” Epidemiology . 15(6): 660-70, Nov 2004.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #75
    2/11/2005
    For each Medicaid smoker that quits through cessation programs supported by ITPC, the State will lock in a savings of $1,340 over that smoker's lifetime.

    Source: Hodgsen, "Cigarette Smoking and Lifetime Medical Expenditures," The Millbank Quarterly .

  • ITPC Fact for Life #76
    2/18/2005
    New research strongly suggests that, in addition to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, infants exposed to secondhand smoke are also at increased risk for colic and acid reflux.

    Source: Shenassa, ED and Brown, MJ: "Maternal Smoking and Infantile Gastrointestinal Dysregulation: The Case of Colic," Pediatrics , Oct 2004; 114: e497 - e505.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #77
    2/25/2005
    For every $1 Indiana spends on tobacco prevention, the tobacco industry spends $42 in marketing and advertising.

    Source: U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC), Cigarette Report for 2002; ITPC.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #78
    3/4/2005
    Smokers employed in smoke-free workplaces consume significantly fewer cigarettes than smokers in workplaces without smoking restrictions.

    Source: NCI, "State and local legislative action to reduce tobacco use. Smoking and Tobacco Control Monograph 11," Bethesda, MD: U.S. DHHS, NCI, Aug 2000.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #79
    3/18/2005
    Initial data shows that within 30 minutes of using spit tobacco, there are increases in heart rate, blood pressure, and adrenaline levels in the bloodstream.

    Source: Wolk R. et al; Journal of the American College of Cardiology , March 14, 2005.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #80
    4/1/2005
    Children born to women who smoked during pregnancy were hospitalized more days during the first 5 years of life than children born to women who didn't smoke.

    Source: Petrou et al. "The association between smoking during pregnancy and hospital inpatient costs in childhood." Soc Sci Med. March 2005; 60(5): 1071-85.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #81
    4/8/2005
    Young adults who smoke are nearly twice as likely to quit smoking if their parents quit smoking when the children were 8 or 9 years old.

    Source: Bricker et al. “Does parental smoking cessation encourage their young adult children to quit smoking? A prospective study”. Addiction. March 2005; 100 (3):379.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #82
    4/15/2005
    High school smoking rates in Indiana have dropped to 21%. This is a 32% decline since 2000.

    Source: 2000 and 2004 Indiana Youth Tobacco Surveys.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #83
    4/22/2005
    In 2004, significantly more Indiana middle school students report being not susceptible to start smoking than in 2002. (59% compared to 52%)

    Source: 2000 and 2004 Indiana Youth Tobacco Surveys.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #84
    4/29/2005
    Employees that smoke had about two times more lost production time (LPT) per week than workers who never smoked, a cost of $27 billion to employers.

    Source: Stewart, WF et al. "Lost productivity work time costs from health conditions in the United States: Results form the American Productivity Audits". Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 45(12): 1234-46, December 2003.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #85
    5/13/2005
    Each year 260 Indiana children lose their moms to smoking. Help a mom you love be smoke free by mother's day next year and call 1.866.515.LIFE for a How to Quit Packet.

    Source: Leistikow, B., et al., "Estimates of Smoking-Attributable Deaths at Ages 15-54, Motherless or Fatherless Youths, and Resulting social Security Costs in the United States in 1994," Preventive Medicine 30(5): 353-360 (May 2000) along with state specific data.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #86
    5/20/2005
    Grandmother’s smoking during a mother’s pregnancy can double the risk of asthma for the child.

    Source: Li, Y-F, Langholz B, Salam MT, Gilliland FD. Maternal and grandmaternal smoking patterns are associated with early childhood asthma. Chest. 2005; 127:1232-1241.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #87
    5/27/2005
    Secondhand smoke significantly increases the chance of breast cancer. Women with regular exposure to tobacco smoke could have up to a 90% greater risk of contracting the disease.

    Source: American Cancer Society, Surveillance Research 1999; National Center for Health Statistics; Vital Statistics of the United States 1998.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #88
    6/3/2005
    Hoosier smokers who received cessation advice from a physician were 2.5 times more likely to want to quit smoking.

    Source: 2002 Indiana Adult Tobacco Survey.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #89
    6/12/2005
    Smokers miss an additional 2.3 days of work per year due to sickness compared to nonsmokers.

    Source: Halpern, M.T.; Shikiar, R.; Rentz, A.M.; Khan, Z.M., “Impact of smoking status on workplace absenteeism and productivity,” Tobacco Control 10(3): 233-238, September 2001.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #90
    6/17/2005
    4,700 Hoosier kids have already lost their dads to smoking. Spend Father's Day helping the men in your life quit smoking.

    Source: Leistikow, B., et al., "Estimates of Smoking-Attributable Deaths at Ages 15-54, Motherless or Fatherless Youths, and Resulting Social Security Costs in the United States in 1994," Preventive Medicine 30(5): 353-360 (May 2000), and state-specific data provided by the author.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #91
    6/24/2005
    Research shows that there is a reduction in children smoking when parents restrict their own smoking at home, sit in a non-smoking section of restaurants and ask others not to smoke in their presence.

    Source: Andersen, M. Robyn et al., "Antismoking Parenting Practices Are Associated with Reduced Rates of Adolescent Smoking," Archives of pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, April 2004, Vol. 158: 348-352.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #92
    7/1/2005
    A recent study revealed that while the number of tobacco brand appearances in movies have dropped in films for adult audiences, they have not dropped in films for children since the Master Settlement Agreement. Tobacco brand appearances in R-rated movies dropped from 30% to 13% while there was no significant decline in tobacco brand appearances in PG-13, PG and G movies.

    Source: Adachi-Mejia, Anna M., et al. Tobacco Brand Appearances in Movies Before and After the Master Settlement Agreement. JAMA, vol. 293: 2341-2342.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #93
    7/8/2005
    Did you know that more teens are likely to try their first cigarette after school's out for the summer? First cigarette use by youth is more likely during June and July than during other months.

    Source: "Seasonality of Youth's First-Time Use of Marijuana, Cigarettes, or Alcohol." Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) 2002 The National Survey on Drug Use and Health Report (NSDUH). 4 June 2004.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #94
    7/15/2005
    Tobacco smoke causes 63% of cancer deaths among black men in the U.S.

    Source: Leistikow, Preventive Medicine, August 2005.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #95
    7/22/2005
    Adults living in households that restrict smoking were 57% more likely to try to quit smoking and two times more likely to successfully quit smoking.

    Source: 2004 Indiana Adult Tobacco Survey.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #96
    7/29/2005
    One in four smokers believe that so-called "reduced exposure" tobacco products are less dangerous than regular cigarettes.

    Source: O'Connor R.J., Hyland A., Giovino G.A., Fong G.T., and Cummings K.M.(2005) "Smoker Awareness of and Beliefs About Supposedly Less-Harmful Tobacco Products". American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 29(2): 85-90.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #97
    8/5/2005
    Hollywood continues to promote smoking as a glamorous act with no ill effects. Tobacco use played a role in 88 of the top grossing films in 2002, and 92 percent of the time the smoking carried no consequences.

    Source: Dozier, D.M.; Lauzen, M.M.; Day, C.A.; Payne, S.M.; Tafoya, M.R., "Leaders and elites: Portrayals of smoking in popular films," Tobacco Control 14(1); 7-9, February 2005.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #98
    8/12/2005
    Youth who have viewed anti-tobacco advertising are more likely to have stronger attitudes against smoking.

    Source: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine; July 2005. Bridging the Gap, a policy research program based at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and the University of Michigan. Funding provided by The National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #99
    8/19/2005
    Youth smoking rates are lower in states with more extensive laws regulating indoor secondhand smoke.

    Source: McMullen, K.M.; Brownson, R.C.; Luke, D.; Chriqui, J., "Strength of clean indoor air laws and smoking related outcomes in the USA," Tobacco Control 14(1); 43-48, February 2005.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #100
    8/26/2005
    Cigarettes, cigars, and other lit tobacco products caused nearly 15,000 residential fires in 2002, resulting in 520 deaths, 1,330 injuries, and $371 million in property damage.

    Source: Residential Smoking Fires and Casualties, National Fire Data Center, part of the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) U.S. Fire Administration, based on data from the 2002 National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS).

  • ITPC Fact for Life #101
    9/2/2005
    Bar and restaurant workers in New York are suffering less from sore throats, runny noses and eye irritation after the smoke free law was enacted.

    Source: M C Farrelly, J M Nonnemaker, R Chou, A Hyland, K K Peterson and U E Bauer. "Changes in hospitality workers' exposure to secondhand smoke following the implementation of New York's smoke-free law." Tobacco Control 2005;14:236-241.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #102
    9/9/2005
    Tobacco cessation is more cost-effective than other common and covered disease prevention interventions, such as the treatment of hypertension and high blood cholesterol.

    Source: Cummings SR, Rubin SM, Oster G. "The cost-effectiveness for counseling smokers to quit." Journal of the American Medical Association 1989; 261(1): 75-79.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #103
    9/16/2005
    Smoke free workplaces are nearly 9 times more cost-effective per new nonsmoker than free nicotine replacement therapy programs.

    Source: Ong and Glantz. "Free Nicotine Replacement Therapy Programs vs Implementing Smoke-Free Workplaces: A Cost-Effectiveness Comparison" American Journal of Public Health June 2005 Vol 95 No. 6, 969-975.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #104
    9/23/2005
    Smokers who smoke 20 cigarettes per day could increase their life expectancy by eight years if they quit before the age of 35.

    Source: Taylor DH Jr. Hasselblad V, Henley SJ, et al. Benefits of smoking cessation for longevity. Am J Public Health 2002; 92:990-6.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #105
    9/29/2005
    An expecting mother needs to know that secondhand smoke exposure during pregnancy can be just as harmful to a developing fetus as smoking a cigarette herself.

    Source: Stephen G Grant, "Qualitatively and quantitatively similar effects of active and passive maternal tobacco smoke exposure on in uteromutagenesis at the HPRTlocus" BMC Pediatrics 2005, 5:20.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #106
    10/7/2005
    Smokers odds in successfully quitting are four times higher if their company offers full coverage insurance on smoking cessation treatments.

    Source: Curry SJ, Grothaus MA, McAfee T, Pabiniak C. "Use and cost effectiveness of smoking-cessation services under four insurance plans in a health maintenance organization." New England Journal of Medicine. 1998; 339(10):673-79.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #107
    10/14/2005
    Smokers have twice the risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, a condition that can cause blindness later in life.

    Source: J Thornton, R Edwards, P Mitchell, R A Harrison, I Buchan and S P Kelly. Smoking and age-related macular degeneration: a review of association, AMD Alliance International Campaign Report 2005:Awareness of Age-related Macular Degeneration and Associated Risk Factors Country Report (UK). Eye (Sep. 2005) 19: 935-944.

"Facts for Life," a weekly e-mail providing statistics on the toll of tobacco to Hoosiers and the state of Indiana, is presented by Indiana Tobacco Prevention and Cessation.

For more information on Indiana Tobacco Prevention and Cessation, visit www.itpc.in.gov, www.WhiteLies.tv or www.Voice.tv.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #108
    10/21/2005
    Adults that lived with a smoker during childhood were more than twice as likely to suffer from respiratory problems such as chronic dry cough.

    Source: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); C Svanes et al. "Parental smoking in childhood and adult obstructive lung disease: results from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey" Thorax 2004; 59:295-302.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #109
    10/28/2005
    Parents who smoke in the presence of their children significantly increase their child's risk of developing nasal cancer and other cancers.

    Source: Hemminki K, Chen B. Parental lung cancer as predictor of cancer risks in offspring: Clues about multiple routes of harmful influence? International Journal of Cancer Aug 10, 2005.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #110
    11/4/2005
    Light smokers cannot avoid serious health consequences. Women who smoke 1-4 cigarettes per day were nearly 5 times as likely to die of lung cancer than women who never smoked.

    Source: K Bjartveit and A Tverdal. "Health consequences of smoking 1-4 cigarettes per day" Tobacco Control 2005;14:315-320.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #111
    12/2/2005
    Did you know that 83% of Hoosier smokers want to quit? In fact, more than 130,000 Indiana adults quit smoking in 2004.

    Source: 2004 Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance Survey; 2004 Indiana Adult Tobacco Survey.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #112
    12/9/2005
    Hoosier youth aware of VOICE, Indiana's youth movement against tobacco use, are 13 times more likely to think that smoking has a negative social image.

    Source: 2005 Indiana Media Tracking Survey.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #113
    12/11/2005
    Smoking, on average, reduces adult life expectancy by approximately 14 years.

    Source: MMWR - Annual Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Years of Potential Life Lost, and Productivity Losses - United States, 1997-2001. July 1, 2005 / Vol. 54 / No. 25.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #114
    12/16/2005
    Young women who smoke prior to their first pregnancy have a 20% higher risk of breast cancer in their later years.

    Source: The Mayo Clinic Proceedings, data from the Iowa Women's Health Study. Research team included Mayo Clinic, Department of Family Preventive Medicine, Health Research Center, Salt Lake City, Utah; and H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Fla.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #115
    12/22/2005
    The effects of secondhand smoke costs the U.S. economy nearly $10 billion each year in medical expenses and lost productivity at work.

    Source: "The economic effects of environmental tobacco smoke", Donald Behan, Michael Eriksen, and Yijia Lin ; March 31, 2005. Society of Actuaries.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #116
    12/30/2005
    ITPC wishes you a healthy, happy and smoke free New Year! If you would like help quitting smoking, call our toll free number for a free packet on how to quit. 1-866-515-LIFE or visit www.WhiteLies.tv.

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Facts for Life: 2006

  • ITPC Fact for Life #117
    1/6/2006
    If you quit smoking today, you will add years to your life. If you quit at age: 60 - you gain 3 years 50 - you gain 6 years 40 - you gain 9 years 30 - you gain 10 years.

    Source: Doll R. et al. "Mortality in relation to smoking: 50 years' observations on male British doctors." BMJ 22 June 2004.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #118
    1/17/2006
    Heart attack rates in Pueblo, Colorado, declined by nearly 30 percent after the city implemented a comprehensive smoke-free workplace law, including restaurants and bars, in July 2003.

    Source: Pueblo Colorado Study on Heart Attacks presented at the American Heart Association meeting in Dallas-November 2005.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #119
    1/20/2006
    In 2002, the Indiana cigarette tax was increased by 40 cents. In the first year, this resulted in an 18 percent decline in cigarette consumption. At the same time, revenue increased 186 percent.

    Source: Indiana Tobacco Prevention and Cessation; data from Indiana Department of Revenue Net Collections Report and Cigarette Stamp Sales.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #120
    1/27/2006
    A 25-cent increase in Indiana's cigarette tax would have the potential for 26,100 fewer future youth smokers.

    Source: Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids (CTFK) " Indiana Cigarette Excise Tax Increases Estimated New Revenues, Cost Savings, and Other Benefits & Effects"

  • ITPC Fact for Life #121
    2/3/2006
    Increasing the unit price for tobacco products is strongly recommended as a strategy to prevent youth smoking and help adults quit.

    Source: The Centers for Disease Control Guide to Community Preventive Services on Tobacco Control. http://www.thecommunityguide.org/tobacco/tobac-int-unit-price.pdf

  • ITPC Fact for Life #122
    2/10/2006
    Heart attack rates in Pueblo, Colorado, declined by nearly 30 percent after the city implemented a comprehensive smoke-free workplace law, including restaurants and bars, in July 2003.

    Source: Pueblo Colorado Study on Heart Attacks presented at the American Heart Association meeting in Dallas-November 2005.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #123
    2/21/2006
    Smokers are up to six times more likely to develop gum disease than nonsmokers.

    Source: 'The effect of quitting smoking on chronic periodontitis': Preshaw PM et al, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 2005; 32: 869-879.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #124
    2/24/2006
    African American smokers are more susceptible to lung cancer than Caucasians, Japanese Americans, and Latinos.

    Source: Haiman, C. et al. "Ethnic and Racial Differences in the Smoking-Related Risk of Lung Cancer" New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 354:333-342 January 26, 2006 Number 4

  • ITPC Fact for Life #125
    3/3/2006
    Twenty-three percent of Hoosiers are now protected against secondhand smoke as Carmel, Greenfield, and Indianapolis go smoke free, an increase from 6% in 2005.

    Source: U.S. Census; Indiana tobacco-related policy tracking

  • ITPC Fact for Life #126
    3/10/2006
    An estimated 47 million U.S. adults have metabolic syndrome, which greatly raises the odds of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Those exposed to secondhand smoke are nearly five times more likely to develop metabolic syndrome.

    Source: Dekker JM, Girman C , Nijpels G , Stehouwer CD, Bouter LM , Heine RJ. "Metabolic syndrome and 10-year cardiovascular disease risk in the Hoorn Study." Circulation. 2005 Aug 2;112(5):666-73.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #127
    3/17/2006
    Irish pubs in smoke-free cities have 95 percent less air pollution than the pubs in U.S. cities that still allow smoking.

    Source: March 16, 2006: Smoke Free Irish Pubs: In Ireland -- Yes, But Not Everywhere http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/irish_pubs/

  • ITPC Fact for Life #128
    3/24/2006
    A study of children ages 10-14 indicate that those with the highest level of exposure to smoking in the movies were 2.6 times more likely to try cigarettes compared to those with the lowest exposure level.

    Source: Sargeant, J.D. et al (2005) Exposure to Movie Smoking: It's Relation to Smoking Initiation among U.S. Adolescents. Pediatrics, 116. 1183-1191.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #129
    3/31/2006
    Smoking causes more than one in every five cancer deaths worldwide.

    Source: Ezzati M.,Henley S.J., Lopez A.D., and Thun M.J. (2005) Role of smoking in global and regional cancer epidemiology: Current patterns and data needs. International Journal of Cancer, 116(6), 963-971.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #130
    4/7/2006
    Cigarette smoke and workplace toxins can multiply the risk of getting lung cancer by as much as 53 times in blue-collar workers.

    Source: Americans for Non-Smokers Rights. Building Trades Unions Ignite Less Tobacco [BUILT] Project, "Unions yes [and] tobacco no," California: Department of Health Services, 2001.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #131
    4/12/2006
    Exposure to secondhand smoke is associated with increased incidence of breast cancer among non-smoking, premenopausal women.

    Source: California Air Resources Board (ARB) Scientific Review Panel (SRP) "Proposed Identification of Environmental Tobacco Smoke as a Toxic Air Containment - June 24, 2005."

  • ITPC Fact for Life #132
    4/21/2006
    Inhaled sidestream cigarette smoke is four times more toxic than mainstream cigarette smoke.

    Source: Schick, S and Glantz S. "Philip Morris toxicological experiments with fresh sidestream smoke: more toxic than mainstream smoke," Tobacco Control 2005; 14:396-404

  • ITPC Fact for Life #133
    4/28/2006
    Hospitality workers in New York State experienced an 89 percent reduction in secondhand smoke exposure after the implementation of a comprehensive smoke free air law.

    Source: Abrams SM et al. "Early evidence on the effectiveness of clear indoor air legislation in New York State," American Journal of Public Health, Feb 2006, Vol. 96, No. 2

  • ITPC Fact for Life #134
    5/8/2006
    The youth of Indiana had a message last Saturday for Drop Dead Day: 27 Hoosiers die each day from Tobacco. An estimated 500 youth "dropped dead" in 44 counties Saturday to symbolize the number of Hoosiers who die each day because of tobacco-related illnesses.

    Source: www.Voice.tv; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. 2005.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #135
    5/15/2006
    Maternal smoking is a leading risk factor for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). If you know a mom who wants to quit smoking, tell them to call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

    Source: Woodward, A. and Laugesen M., "How many deaths are caused by secondhand cigarette smoke?" Tobacco Control, 10: 383-388, December 2001.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #136
    5/26/2006
    Worldwide, nearly nine percent of students aged 13-15 years currently smoked cigarettes and 11 percent used tobacco products other than cigarettes. May 31 is World No Tobacco Day. Comprehensive tobacco control programs that include evidence-based interventions for adolescents are needed to decrease the burden of tobacco-related diseases worldwide.

    Source: MMWR, "Use of Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products Among Students Aged 13-15 years - Worldwide 1999-2005," May 26, 2006

  • ITPC Fact for Life #137
    6/2/2006
    Viewing smoking in movies is associated with "established" smoking in adolescents. Youth with high exposure to smoking in the movies were more than two times more likely to become established smokers compared to youth with minimal exposure to smoking films.

    Source: Sargent, J. findings presented at 2006 Pediatric Academic Societies' Annual Meeting in San Francisco. Additional research can be viewed at http://dms.dartmouth.edu/news/2005_h2/07nov2005_sargent.shtml

  • ITPC Fact for Life #138
    6/9/2006
    Eliminating exposure to secondhand smoke would prevent more than 228,000 new cases of heart disease in the U.S.

    Source: Lightwood, J. University of California at San Francisco. American Heart Association 7th Scientific Forum on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research on Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke, Washington D.C., May 2006.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #139
    6/16/2006
    4,700 Hoosier youth have already lost their dads to smoking. For help in quitting call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

    Source: Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). U.S. Bureau of Census, 2003 population estimates.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #140
    6/23/2006
    The cardiovascular effects of secondhand smoke exposure are 80-90 percent of those effects caused by chronic active smoking.

    Source: Barnoya, J.; Glantz, S.A., "Cardiovascular effects of secondhand smoke: nearly as large as smoking," Circulation 111(20): 2684-2698, May 24, 2005.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #141
    6/30/2006
    Scientific evidence indicates that there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke.

    Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2006.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #142
    7/6/2006
    More than half of all smokeless tobacco (chew) users develop leukoplakia, an oral disease which often leads to oral cancer, within just three years of use.

    Source: The S.T.O.P Guide (The Smokeless Tobacco and Outreach and Prevention Guide): A Comprehensive Directory of Smokeless Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Resources. Applied Behavioral Science Press, 1997; Hatsukami, D. and H Severson, "Oral Spit Tobacco Prevention and Treatment. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 1999, 1:21-44.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #143
    7/14/2006
    Active smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke in non-smokers is associated with developing glucose intolerance, a precursor to diabetes.

    Source: Houston, TK, et al. "Active and passing smoking and development of glucose intolerance among youth adults in a prospective cohort: CARDIA study," BMJ (April 7, 2006)

  • ITPC Fact for Life #144
    7/21/2006
    High School students who use spit tobacco regularly are nearly 16 times more likely to consume alcohol, four times more likely to use marijuana and three times more likely to use inhalants.

    Source: Everett, SA et al. "Other Substances Use Among High School Student Who Use Tobacco." Journal of Adolescent Health.1998. 23;5:289-296.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #145
    7/28/2006
    If current smoking patterns continue, it will cause some 10 million deaths each year by 2020. Half the people that smoke today - that is about 650 million people- will eventually be killed by tobacco.

    Source: World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/tobacco/en/

  • ITPC Fact for Life #146
    9/18/2006
    Eliminating smoking in indoor spaces fully protects nonsmokers from exposure to secondhand smoke. Separating smokers from nonsmokers, cleaning the air, and ventilating buildings cannot eliminate exposures of nonsmokers to secondhand smoke.

    Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2006.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #153
    9/29/2006
    Smoke free homes reduce the odds of smoking by youth and young adults living with parents.

    Source: Clark PI. et al. "Impact of Home Smoking Rules on Smoking Patterns Among Adolescents and Youth Adults." Preventing Chronic Disease. Vol 3: No 2. April 2006

  • ITPC Fact for Life #154
    10/6/2006
    Exposure to secondhand smoke takes place in public places, worksites, vehicles and homes. Levels of a chemical called cotinine, a biomarker of secondhand smoke exposure, was reported in 43% of U.S. nonsmokers.

    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Department of Health and Human Services, "Second National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals," National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH Pub. No. 02-0716) January 2003.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #155
    10/13/2006
    Increasing the price of cigarettes is highly effective in preventing youth from starting to smoke and in the transition from experimental smoking to daily smoking among youth.

    Source: Tauras JA, O'Malley PM, Johnston LD. "Effects of Price and Access Laws on Teenage Smoking Initiation: A National Longitudinal Analysis. April 2001

  • ITPC Fact for Life #156
    10/24/2006
    Each Hoosier household spends $522 in tobacco-related medical costs regardless of whether they smoke or not.

    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. MMWR - Annual Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Years of Potential Life Lost, and Productivity Losses - United States, 1997-2001. MMWR Highlights. 1 July 2005. Vol. 54. No. 25.-State estimate

  • ITPC Fact for Life #157
    11/3/2006
    Household contamination and infant exposure from secondhand smoke was 5-7 times higher in homes of smokers that smoke outdoors compared to households of nonsmokers.

    Source: Matt GE. “Households contaminated by environmental tobacco smoke: sources of infant exposures”. Tobacco Control. 2004; 13:29-37.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #160
    12/11/2006
    Higher cigarette prices increase the demand for cessation products.

    Source: Center for Urban Policy and the Environment

  • ITPC Fact for Life #161
    12/11/2006
    Cigarette price increases help prevent youth from initiating smoking and from increasing their cigarette consumption.

    Source: Center for Urban Policy and the Environment


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Facts for Life: 2007

  • ITPC Fact for Life #162
    3/2/2007
    Cigarette price increases are particularly effective in reducing smoking among pregnant women.

    Source: Center for Urban Policy and the Environment.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #163
    3/2/2007
    Smoking among low-income people is highly responsive to price.

    Source: Center for Urban Policy and the Environment.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #164
    3/2/2007
    In Indiana, an increase of only $0.25 per pack of cigarettes would have significant effects on decreasing the number of low-income smokers.

    Source: Center for Urban Policy and the Environment.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #165
    3/16/2007
    52,900. The number of adult smokers who would quit if Indiana increased the cigarette tax by $1.00.

    Source: "Indiana cigarette excise tax increases estimated new revenues, cost savings, and other benefits and effects" based on estimates from CDC and Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #166
    3/23/2007
    Indiana spends $7.57 in smoking-related health costs and productivity losses for every pack of cigarettes sold.

    Source: "Toll of Tobacco on Indiana," CTFK, based on CDC Tobacco Control: Data Highlights 2006 and State System average annual productivity losses 1997-2001.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #167
    4/5/2007
    On April 1st, Valparaiso became Indiana's newest smoke free community. 40% of the state's population is protected by a smoke free ordinance, compared to just 3% in 2000.

    Source: The Indiana Tobacco Prevention Cessation Agency.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #169
    4/30/2007
    Tobacco companies spent $425 million on marketing in Indiana, compared to $10.8 million on programs to prevent kids from smoking and help smokers quit.

    Source: 2005 Federal Trade Commission Report of Cigarette Marketing; ITPC SFY 2007 budget.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #170
    5/11/2007
    Nearly 1 out of every 5 babies born has been exposed to tobacco smoke during pregnancy. Help a mom you love quit smoking by calling 1-800- QUIT-NOW.

    Source: 2004 Indiana Birth Certificate Data.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #171
    5/25/2007
    Use of "light" cigarettes is associated with lower odds of quitting smoking. More than one-third of those who ever-smoked reported use of "light" cigarettes to reduce health risks.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #172
    6/1/2007
    On June 1st, Fort Wayne is a 100% smoke free community. 40% of the state's population is protected by a smoke free air law, compared to just 3% in 2000.

    Source: ITPC policy tracking.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #173
    6/15/2007
    Youth living with a father that smokes is nearly 3 times more likely to smoke themselves. For help in quitting smoking call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

    Source: Bantle, Christian and Haisken-DeNew, John P., "Smoke Signals: The Intergenerational Transmission of Smoking Behavior" (February 2002). DIW Discussion Paper No. 277. http://ssrn.com/abstract=381381

  • ITPC Fact for Life #175
    7/9/2007
    46 percent of Hoosier smokers say cost is an important reason they want to quit smoking. The cost of cigarettes increased by 44 cents on July 1. For help quitting see your health care provider or call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

    Source: 2006 Indiana Adult Tobacco Survey.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #176
    7/13/2007
    Fact #176 Thirty percent of Hoosier smokers are ready to quit in the next 30 days. Health care providers stand ready to help them quit. For help quitting see your health care provider or call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

    Source: 2006 Indiana Adult Tobacco Survey.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #177
    7/23/2007
    Hoosiers are ready to quit! Four out of five African American Smokers tried to quit smoking in the past year. For help see your health care provider or call 1-800-QUIT-NOW. There's never been a better time to quit.

    Source: 2006 Indiana Adult Tobacco Survey For more information on Indiana Tobacco Prevention and Cessation, visit www.itpc.in.gov, www.WhiteLies.tv or http://www.voice.tv/.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #178
    11/2/2007
    Nonsmoking restaurant and bar employees absorb a potent, tobacco-specific carcinogen known as NNK when they are exposed to secondhand smoke in the workplace
     
    Source:
    American Journal of Public Health, Stark et al.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #179
    11/9/2007
    One in five Irish smokers are lighting up less at home since the introduction of the smoke free law in 2004.
     
    Source:
    Hyland A, et al. “Does smokefree Ireland have more smoking inside the home and less in pubs than the UK? Findings from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project” European Journal of Public Health.” Published online June 20, 2007.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #180
    11/16/2007
    Maternal exposure to secondhand smoke during pregnancy is associated with increased prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder symptoms in children.
     
    Source:
    Journal of Child Psychiatry and Human Development

  • ITPC Fact for Life #181
    12/1/2007
    Teens exposed to secondhand smoke at home are at increased risk of failing tests in school, a U.S. and British study suggests. Exposure to secondhand smoke at home decreased the odds of passing standardized achievement tests by 30 percent in high school students 16- and 18-year-olds.
     
    Source:
    Journal of Adolescent Health

  • ITPC Fact for Life #182
    12/7/2007
    Secondhand smoke has been associated with significant health threats to pets, such as oral cancer and lymphoma in cats, lung and nasal cancer in dogs, and lung cancer in birds.
     
    Source:
    Oklahoma State University; US Dept. of Agriculture; August 31, 2007

  • ITPC Fact for Life #183
    12/14/2007
    Your chances of contracting seasonal flu will be lower if you quit smoking.  Research shows an increase in flu among smokers compared to nonsmokers. There is a higher death rate from the flu for smokers than for nonsmokers.

    Source:
    Arcavi, Lidia; Benowitz, Neal L. Cigarette Smoking and Infection. Archives of Internal Medicine, 2004 164:2206-2216.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #184
    12/21/2007
    Smoking or chewing tobacco can cause blood vessels to constrict and decrease circulation, thus increasing susceptibility to cold injuries, such as frostbite, especially in the hands and feet.

    Source:
    Lindsell, Christopher J. Test Battery for Assessing Vascular Disturbances of Fingers. Environ. Health Prev. Med., Vol. 10 pp.341-350 (2005).

  • ITPC Fact for Life #185
    12/28/2007
    Those making a resolution are ten times more likely to succeed than those not making a resolution. Resolve to quit smoking this New Year. Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW for help.

    Source:
    Norcross, J.C., Mrykalo, M.S., & Blagys, M.D. (2002). Auld lang syne: Success predictors, change processes, and self-reported outcomes of New Year's resolvers and nonresolvers. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 58(4), 397-405.

Facts for Life: 2008

  • ITPC Fact for Life #186
    1/4/2008
    Encourage someone you love to call 1-800-QUIT-NOW. It may be the best gift of the season!


  • ITPC Fact for Life #187
    1/11/ 2008
    Just a single cigarette may drag a teen into smoking addiction. A third of kids who tried smoking claim their first cigarette brought them a feeling of relaxation -- and two-thirds of those kids went on to become smokers.
     
    Source:
    DeFranza, J.R. et al; Susceptibility to Nicotine Dependence: The Development and Assessment of Nicotine Dependence in Youth 2 Study. Pediatrics Vol.120 No. 4 October 2007, pp. e974-e983.


  • ITPC Fact for Life #188
    1/18/2008
    Men with osteoarthritis experience more severe pain and more loss of cartilage on average if they are smokers.

    Source:
    Amin, S., Niu, J., Guermazi, A. et al.; Cigarette smoking and the risk for cartilage loss and knee pain in men with knee osteoarthritis.
    Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 2007; 66:18-22. http://www.livescience.com/health/061207_smoking_knees.html

  • ITPC Fact for Life #189
    1/25/2008
    Otherwise healthy men who smoke risk developing erectile dysfunction. The more cigarettes they smoke, the greater the risk.

    Source:
    He, Jiang et al. Cigarette Smoking and Erectile Dysfunction among Chinese Men without Clinical Vascular Disease. American Journal of Epidemiology, 2007 166(7):803-809.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #190
    2/1/2008
    The number of admissions to New York hospitals for heart attack decreased by 8 percent in the first year after New York's comprehensive statewide smoking ban took effect.

    Source: Juster, Harlan R. et al. Declines in Hospital Admissions for Acute Myocardial Infarction in New York State After Implementation of a Comprehensive Smoking Ban. Am J Public Health, Nov 2007; 97: 2035 - 2039.


  • ITPC Fact for Life #191
    2/8/2008
    Infants whose mothers smoke during pregnancy have much higher blood pressure in their first months of life.

    Source: C. C. Geerts, D. E. Grobbee, C. K. van der Ent, B. M. de Jong, M. M. van der Zalm, N. van Putte-Katier, J. L.L. Kimpen, and C. S.P.M. Uiterwaal. Tobacco Smoke Exposure of Pregnant Mothers and Blood Pressure in Their Newborns: Results from the Wheezing Illnesses Study. Hypertension, September 1, 2007; 50(3): 572 – 578.  http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=3049161

  • ITPC Fact for Life #192
    2/15/2008
    Smokers are five times more likely to give up cigarettes if their spouse or partner quits.
     
    Source:
    The Health and Retirement Study, A Longitudinal Study of Health, Retirement, and Aging. Sponsored by the National Institute on Aging, U.S. National Institutes of Health. http://www.livescience.com/health/071003-mirror-spouse.html

  • ITPC Fact for Life #193
    2/22/2008
    Even a little exposure to secondhand smoke in a public environment or at home can be harmful to the cardiovascular system of otherwise healthy children.
     
    Source:
    Kallio et. al. Harmful secondhand tobacco smoke can be detected in kids as young as 11. Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association: AHA rapid access journal report, June 2007.
    http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml;jsessionid=UIF3YAFZ4W4YYCQFCXPSDSQ?identifier=3048209

  • ITPC Fact for Life #194
    2/29/2008
    Low tar or "lite" cigarettes impair blood flow through the heart just as severely as regular cigarettes.
     
    Source:
    BMJ Specialty Journals (2007, May 15). 'Lite' Low Tar Cigarettes Impair Blood Flow As Much As Regular Cigarettes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 23, 2008, from http://www.sciencedaily.com/¬ /releases/2007/05/070515074929.htm


  • ITPC Fact for Life #195
    3/7/2008
    Despite the undeniable fact that tobacco products kill, they are still exempt from basic health regulations that apply to other products such as food, drugs and cosmetics. 
     
    Source:
    “Big Tobacco’s Guinea Pigs: How an Unregulated Industry Experiments on   America’s Kids and Consumers” www.tobaccofreekids.org/productsreport

  • ITPC Fact for Life #196
    3/14/2008
    Despite the undeniable fact that tobacco products kill, they are still exempt from basic health regulations that apply to other products such as food, drugs and cosmetics. 
     
    Source:
    “Big Tobacco’s Guinea Pigs: How an Unregulated Industry Experiments on   America’s Kids and Consumers” www.tobaccofreekids.org/productsreport

  • ITPC Fact for Life #197
    3/28/2008
    Flavors such as toffee, sour apple, lime, chocolate,a and pineapple mask the harshness of tobacco products and makes them more appealing to new users, especially children.
     
    Source:
    “Big Tobacco’s Guinea Pigs: How an Unregulated Industry experiments on America’s Kids and Consumers” www.tobaccofreekids.org/productsreport

  • ITPC Fact for Life #198
    4/4/2008
    Evidence shows that nicotine dependency increases stress. The perceived “relaxing” effect of smoking only comes from the reversal of the tension and irritability symptoms of nicotine withdrawal.

    Source: Parrott, A.C. "Does Cigarette Smoking Cause Stress?" American Psychologist, 1999 Oct., Vol. 54(10) 817-820.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #199
    4/11/2008
    Nicotine is a stimulant which may make it harder to fall asleep, and as nicotine wears off during the night, nicotine withdrawal may kick in, hindering sleep.
     
    Source:
    Zhang, Lin, Samet, Jonathan, Caffo, Brian, Bankman, Isaac, Punjabi, Naresh M., “Power Spectral Analysis of EEG Activity During Sleep in Cigarette Smokers” Chest 2008 133: 427-432.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #200
    4/18/2008
    The growing, processing and smoking of tobacco have major negative impacts on our local and global environments.

    Source:
    To find out more, visit:  www.smokefreekids.info/01env_main.htm

  • ITPC Fact for Life #201
    4/25/2008
    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among both African American men and women.

    Source: Cancer Facts and Figures for African Americans, 2007-2008  http://www.cancer.org/downloads/STT/CAFF2007AAacspdf2007.pdf

  • ITPC Fact for Life #202
    5/2/2008
    Recently published research indicates that exposure to secondhand smoke in the workplace nearly doubles ones risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
     
    Source: 
    Hayashino, Y., et.al. for the HIPOP-OHP Research Group. “A prospective study of passive smoking and risk of diabetes in a cohort of workers: The High-risk and Population Strategy for Occupational Health Promotion (HIPOP-OHP) Study.” Diabetes Care 2008 Jan 30 [Epub ahead of print]

  • ITPC Fact for Life #203
    5/9/2008
    When women quit smoking, they improve the health of the people around as well.
    Mothers who give up smoking improve the odds that their children will grow up to be tobacco-free and lead healthier, longer lives.

    Source: Leistikow, B, et al., "Estimates of Smoking-Attributable Deaths at Ages 15-54, Motherless or Fatherless Youths, and Resulting Social Security Costs in the United States in 1994," Preventive Medicine 30(5): 353-360, May 2000, and state-specific data provided by the author.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #204
    5/16/2008
    Black male workers, construction/manufacturing sector workers, and blue-collar and service workers have the highest cotinine levels, as disparities still exist in workplace exposure to secondhand smoke.
     
    Source:
    Arheart, K.L. et. al., “Declining trends in serum cotinine levels in US worker groups: the power of policy.” Occupational Environmental Medicine. 2008 Jan; 50(1):57-63.


  • ITPC Fact for Life #205
    5/23/2008
    Scientific research demonstrates that when venues comply with smokefree air laws, there is an immediate improvement in indoor air quality.
     
    Source:
    Lee, K.; Hahn, E.J.; Riker, C.; Seithers, P., "Immediate impact of smoke-free laws on indoor air quality," Southern Medical Journal 100(9): 885-889, September 2007.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #206
    5/30/2008
    More than 100 of the nearly 600 documented cigarette additives have pharmacological effects that camouflage the odor of tobacco smoke, enhance or maintain nicotine delivery, increase the addictiveness of cigarettes, and mask symptoms associated with smoking.

    Source: Rabinoff M., Caskey N, Rissling A, Park C., “Pharmacological and chemical effects of cigarette additives” American Journal of Public Health, 2007 Nov; 97(11):1981-91.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #207
    6/6/2008
    4.3% of Indiana men are spit tobacco users. Spit tobacco has levels of cancer-causing nitrosamines that are generally 1,000 times greater than those found in any other consumer product.

    Sources: 2007 Indiana Adult Tobacco Survey; Hecht, Stephen S. “Progress and Challenges in Selected Areas of Tobacco Carcinogenesis.” Chem. Res. Toxicol., 21, 1, 160 - 171, 2008.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #208
    6/13/2008
    25.9% of Indiana men are smokers. 5,900 Hoosier men will die this year from smoking-related diseases, and 1,200 sons and daughters will lose their dads.
    This Father’s Day, show your support for tobacco control initiatives that will help smoking fathers quit and prevent their sons and daughters from ever starting.

    Sources:
    2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Tobacco-Free Kids: http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/research/factsheets/pdf/0236.pdf

  • ITPC Fact for Life #209
    6/20/2008
    Smokers have a higher risk of developing Crohn's Disease than non-smokers.  

    Source: 
    Cottone, M. “Smoking habits and recurrence in Crohn's disease.” Gastroenterology - March 1994 (Vol. 106, Issue 3, Pages 643-648).

  • ITPC Fact for Life #210
    6/27/2008
    The World Health Organization (WHO) warns that 1 billion people worldwide could die of tobacco-related causes this century unless urgent action is taken. 

    Source:
    World Health Organization, WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2008.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #211
    7/11/2008
    Cervical cancer is the third leading cancer type in women worldwide. Research suggests a direct interaction between cigarette smoke and the human papillomavirus (HPV) that may lead to increased risk of cervical cancer.

    Source:
    S. Alam, M.J. Conway, H.S. Chen, C. Meyers. 2008. “The cigarette smoke carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene enhances human papillomavirus synthesis.” Journal of Virology, 82. 2: 1053-1058.


  • ITPC Fact for Life #212
    7/18/2008
    Smokers have a 44 percent increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with non-smokers.  This association is stronger for heavy smokers compared with lighter smokers. 

    Source:
    Willi, C.; Bodenmann, P.; Ghali, W.A.; Faris, P.D.; Cornuz, J. Active Smoking and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes – A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA. 2007; 298(22):2654-2664. 

  • ITPC Fact for Life #213
    7/25/2008
    Youth that live in cities with strong smoke free air laws have significantly lower odds of becoming established smokers, compared with those living in cities with weaker or no smoke free air laws.

    Source: Siegel, M. et al. “Local Restaurant Smoking Regulations and the Adolescent Smoking Initiation Process” Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. 2008 May; 162(5):477-483.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #214
    8/1/2008
    Exposure to secondhand smoke during infancy significantly increases the risk of severe infection requiring hospitalization later in childhood.

    Source:
    Kwok MK, et al “Early life second-hand smoke exposure and serious infectious morbidity during the first 8 years: Evidence from Hong Kong's 'Children of 1997' birth cohort” Tobacco Control May, 2008.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #215
    8/8/2008
    Smoking spreads through close and distant social networks. Smokers often quit in groups, and social support networks are vital to a smoker’s quit attempts. Help someone quit by telling them to call 1-800-QUIT-NOW for free help.

    Source:
    Christakis, NA, Fowler, JH. “The Collective Dynamics of Smoking in a Large Social Network.” N Engl J Med, 2008; 358:2249-58.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #216
    8/15/2008
    As hookah bars become more prevalent on college campuses, it is important to educate college students about water pipes. Twenty percent of college students reported smoking water pipes within a 30-day period. These users were more likely to perceive water pipe tobacco smoking as less harmful than cigarette use.

    Source:
    Eissenberg T, Ward KD, Smith-Simone S, Maziak W. “Water pipe Tobacco Smoking on a U.S. College Campus: Prevalence and Correlates.”
    J Adolesc Health. 2008 May; 42(5): 526-9.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #217
    8/29/2008
    The number of asthma-related admissions to Lexington, KY hospitals declined 22% after Lexington’s smoke-free law took effect.

    Source:
    Mary Kay Rayens PhD, Patricia V. Burkhart PhD, RN, Mei Zhang MPH, RN, Seongjik Lee EdS, Debra K. Moser DNSc, RN, David Mannino MD and Ellen J. Hahn DNS, RN. “Reduction in asthma-related emergency department visits after implementation of a smoke-free law.” Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Article in Press.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #218
    9/5/2008
    September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month.
     
    Smoking significantly increases the risk of developing ovarian cancer. Fortunately, the risk returns to normal after long-term smoking cessation.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #219
    9/12/2008
    Smoking has been linked to lower cognitive functioning and greater risk of memory loss in middle-aged adults.
     
    Source:
    Sabia, S. et al. Smoking History and Cognitive Function in Middle Age from the Whitehall II Study. Arch Intern Med. June 2008; 168(11):1165-1173.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #220
    9/19/2008
    September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month
    Middle-aged men who are long-term, heavy smokers face twice the risk of developing more aggressive forms of prostate cancer than men who have never smoked.

    Source:
    Plaskon, L.A. et al. Cigarette Smoking and Risk of Prostate Cancer in Middle-Aged Men. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention. Vol. 12, 604-609, July 2003.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #221
    9/26/2008
    Secondhand smoke exposure during pregnancy affects breathing pauses in premature infants.  This may explain why the risk of SIDS is higher in infants exposed to cigarette smoke.
     
    Source:
    Schneider, J. et. al. Prenatal Cigarette Smoke Exposure Attenuates Recovery from Hypoxemic Challenge in Preterm Infants Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. June 2008.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #222
    10/3/2008
    A recent study found that college students at a historically black university preferred "little cigars" (common brands Prime Time and Winchester) to cigarettes for various reasons, including taste, smell, a better "buzz," social purposes, status, and false perceptions that smoking little cigars is less addictive and less harmful than smoking cigarettes.

    Source: Jolly, D.H. Exploring the use of little cigars by students at a historically black university. Prev Chronic Dis. 2008 Jul; 5(3):A82.

  • ITPC Fact for Life #223
    10/10/2008
    Smokers suffer from greater muscle fatigue than nonsmokers, possibly due to carbon monoxide and/or other substances limiting oxygen delivery and mitochondrial function.

    Source: Wust, R.C. et al. Skeletal muscle properties and fatigue resistance in relation to smoking history. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2008 Sep; 104(1):103-10.